Efficacy of Direct Blood Pressure Biofeedback for Individuals with Mild Hypertension

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151463
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of Direct Blood Pressure Biofeedback for Individuals with Mild Hypertension
Abstract:
Efficacy of Direct Blood Pressure Biofeedback for Individuals with Mild Hypertension
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Tsai, Pei-Shan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Taipei Medical University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Mei-Yeh Wang, MSN
Aim: The purpose of this study was to examine whether a 4-week BP biofeedback program can reduce BP and BP reactivity to stress in participants with stage 1 hypertension. Specifically, we tested whether BP biofeedback exerts a specific treatment effect other than a generalized relaxation effect that may be induced simply by regularly visiting a therapist. Methods: A total of 38 subjects consented to participate in this study and were randomized to the experimental biofeedback group (n = 19) and the placebo biofeedback group (n = 19). Participants in the experimental group were trained in 4 weekly laboratory sessions to self-regulate their BP with continuous BP feedback signals while participants in the placebo group was told to manipulate their BP without feedback signals. Baseline measurements including BP, body weight (BW), state anxiety, skin conductance, BP reactivity to stress, and heart rate variability were assessed on week 1 before training. Eight weeks following the training period (week 12 follow-up) all participants were tested again. Results: The decrease in SBP from baseline at week 12 follow-up was significantly larger in the experimental biofeedback group as compared with the placebo group (95% CI = 2.1 ? 12.7, p = 0.011). Analysis of covariance with the follow-up SBP as the dependent variable, baseline SBP as the covariate and group as the independent variable showed that biofeedback training significantly lower SBP (?= -5.57, 95% CI = -10.019 ? -1.980, p = 0.047). The pre-to-post differences in skin conductance and SBP reactivity were significant for the experimental group but not for the placebo control group. For the sample as a whole and for the experimental group, state anxiety score and BW remained unchanged at follow-up. Conclusions: Direct BP biofeedback is effective in reducing BP in individuals with mild hypertension, possibly through reducing reactivity to stress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of Direct Blood Pressure Biofeedback for Individuals with Mild Hypertensionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151463-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Efficacy of Direct Blood Pressure Biofeedback for Individuals with Mild Hypertension</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsai, Pei-Shan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Taipei Medical University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ptsai@tmu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mei-Yeh Wang, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: The purpose of this study was to examine whether a 4-week BP biofeedback program can reduce BP and BP reactivity to stress in participants with stage 1 hypertension. Specifically, we tested whether BP biofeedback exerts a specific treatment effect other than a generalized relaxation effect that may be induced simply by regularly visiting a therapist. Methods: A total of 38 subjects consented to participate in this study and were randomized to the experimental biofeedback group (n = 19) and the placebo biofeedback group (n = 19). Participants in the experimental group were trained in 4 weekly laboratory sessions to self-regulate their BP with continuous BP feedback signals while participants in the placebo group was told to manipulate their BP without feedback signals. Baseline measurements including BP, body weight (BW), state anxiety, skin conductance, BP reactivity to stress, and heart rate variability were assessed on week 1 before training. Eight weeks following the training period (week 12 follow-up) all participants were tested again. Results: The decrease in SBP from baseline at week 12 follow-up was significantly larger in the experimental biofeedback group as compared with the placebo group (95% CI = 2.1 ? 12.7, p = 0.011). Analysis of covariance with the follow-up SBP as the dependent variable, baseline SBP as the covariate and group as the independent variable showed that biofeedback training significantly lower SBP (?= -5.57, 95% CI = -10.019 ? -1.980, p = 0.047). The pre-to-post differences in skin conductance and SBP reactivity were significant for the experimental group but not for the placebo control group. For the sample as a whole and for the experimental group, state anxiety score and BW remained unchanged at follow-up. Conclusions: Direct BP biofeedback is effective in reducing BP in individuals with mild hypertension, possibly through reducing reactivity to stress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:03:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:03:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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