2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151483
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Evidence to Support Online Education
Abstract:
The Evidence to Support Online Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 9, 2003
Author:Ward, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Middle Tennessee State University
In the face of the rapidly expanding body of knowledge that nurses are expected to incorporate into their practice, more and more nurses and their employers are recognizing the need for continuing education. For the associate degree or diploma nurse, this continuing education frequently equates with the acquisition of a baccalaureate degree. Those nurses with a baccalaureate degree seek graduate level education. And for all nurses, conferences, workshops and conventions fulfill the desire to learn about new evidence in their areas of specialization. Concurrently with the demand for more education, the healthcare arena is battling an increasing nursing shortage requiring nurses to deal with heavy patient loads, higher acuity levels and mandatory overtime. At the end of a workday, nurses are often frustrated and drained. In spite of a desire to continue their education and increase their knowledge, it is difficult to muster the energy to attend educational events scheduled at someone else’s convenience. Online classes and continuing education offerings provide an alternative method to meet the busy nurse’s needs and allow for personal scheduling of educational activities. This avenue of instruction allows for individual flexibility while maintaining academic quality. There is a growing body of evidence (Damazo, Shovein, Huston, & Fox, 2002; White & Weight, 2000; Levin, Levin & Waddoups, 1999; Ryan, Carlton & Ali, 1999) attesting to the value of online delivery. Research findings regarding online education, as well as data demonstrating the success of an online RN/BSN program, will be presented in this session to assist the attendee in weighing the evidence about this ever-growing trend in education. Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1) Cite three examples of evidence in support of online learning; and 2) name one specific strategy to assist in providing online education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
9-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Evidence to Support Online Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151483-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Evidence to Support Online Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 9, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ward, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Middle Tennessee State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kward@mtsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In the face of the rapidly expanding body of knowledge that nurses are expected to incorporate into their practice, more and more nurses and their employers are recognizing the need for continuing education. For the associate degree or diploma nurse, this continuing education frequently equates with the acquisition of a baccalaureate degree. Those nurses with a baccalaureate degree seek graduate level education. And for all nurses, conferences, workshops and conventions fulfill the desire to learn about new evidence in their areas of specialization. Concurrently with the demand for more education, the healthcare arena is battling an increasing nursing shortage requiring nurses to deal with heavy patient loads, higher acuity levels and mandatory overtime. At the end of a workday, nurses are often frustrated and drained. In spite of a desire to continue their education and increase their knowledge, it is difficult to muster the energy to attend educational events scheduled at someone else&rsquo;s convenience. Online classes and continuing education offerings provide an alternative method to meet the busy nurse&rsquo;s needs and allow for personal scheduling of educational activities. This avenue of instruction allows for individual flexibility while maintaining academic quality. There is a growing body of evidence (Damazo, Shovein, Huston, &amp; Fox, 2002; White &amp; Weight, 2000; Levin, Levin &amp; Waddoups, 1999; Ryan, Carlton &amp; Ali, 1999) attesting to the value of online delivery. Research findings regarding online education, as well as data demonstrating the success of an online RN/BSN program, will be presented in this session to assist the attendee in weighing the evidence about this ever-growing trend in education. Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1) Cite three examples of evidence in support of online learning; and 2) name one specific strategy to assist in providing online education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:03:49Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-09en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:03:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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