Factors Associated With Depression Screening of Women Across the Lifespan by Certified Nurse Midwives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151486
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Associated With Depression Screening of Women Across the Lifespan by Certified Nurse Midwives
Abstract:
Factors Associated With Depression Screening of Women Across the Lifespan by Certified Nurse Midwives
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sanders, Lorraine, NP, CNM, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Hunter Bellevue School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Background: Women are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, with a risk ratio of 2:1. The American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM) released a position paper in 2002 calling for the integration of depression care for women across the lifespan into midwifery practice. Certified nurse midwives/certified midwives (CNMs/CMs) have a significant role in the provision of care to women across the lifespan but little is known about their depression screening practices. Objectives: To describe the depression screening practice of CNMs/CMs and to examine the relationships between depression screening, attitude, perceived ability, knowledge, and demographics using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Method: Self-report survey of CNMs/CMs (n=387) attending the 2004 ACNM annual meeting. Findings: Only 25% of respondents (n=95) reported that they always screened women for depression and only 12.4 % of respondents (n=47) reported knowledge of the ACNM depression position statement. A relationship was found between depression screening and attitude (pr =.27, p = .000), perceived ability (pr =.25, p = .000), knowledge ( pr =.16, p = .004), education level (pr =.12, p = .036). Conclusion: Attitude, perceived ability, knowledge, and education account for 20% of the variance of depression screening among CNMs/CMs. Study findings suggest that depression screening is not fully integrated into the practice of many CNMs/CMs. Theoretically, an educational intervention may positively influence attitude, ability, and knowledge, which in turn, may increase integration of depression care into midwifery practice. The provision of universal depression screening may improve health outcomes to women and their families. Further research is needed to assess screening methods, interventions for the treatment of depression, and evaluation of institutional barriers to depression screening of women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Associated With Depression Screening of Women Across the Lifespan by Certified Nurse Midwivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151486-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Associated With Depression Screening of Women Across the Lifespan by Certified Nurse Midwives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sanders, Lorraine, NP, CNM, DNSc </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hunter Bellevue School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lsanders@optonline.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Women are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, with a risk ratio of 2:1. The American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM) released a position paper in 2002 calling for the integration of depression care for women across the lifespan into midwifery practice. Certified nurse midwives/certified midwives (CNMs/CMs) have a significant role in the provision of care to women across the lifespan but little is known about their depression screening practices. Objectives: To describe the depression screening practice of CNMs/CMs and to examine the relationships between depression screening, attitude, perceived ability, knowledge, and demographics using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Method: Self-report survey of CNMs/CMs (n=387) attending the 2004 ACNM annual meeting. Findings: Only 25% of respondents (n=95) reported that they always screened women for depression and only 12.4 % of respondents (n=47) reported knowledge of the ACNM depression position statement. A relationship was found between depression screening and attitude (pr =.27, p = .000), perceived ability (pr =.25, p = .000), knowledge ( pr =.16, p = .004), education level (pr =.12, p = .036). Conclusion: Attitude, perceived ability, knowledge, and education account for 20% of the variance of depression screening among CNMs/CMs. Study findings suggest that depression screening is not fully integrated into the practice of many CNMs/CMs. Theoretically, an educational intervention may positively influence attitude, ability, and knowledge, which in turn, may increase integration of depression care into midwifery practice. The provision of universal depression screening may improve health outcomes to women and their families. Further research is needed to assess screening methods, interventions for the treatment of depression, and evaluation of institutional barriers to depression screening of women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:03:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:03:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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