2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151489
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing a Healthy Workforce: Does Hardiness Training Make a Difference
Abstract:
Developing a Healthy Workforce: Does Hardiness Training Make a Difference
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Judkins, Sharon Kay, RN, PhD, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Arlington
Title:director, nursing administration program
Co-Authors:Leslie Furlow, RN, PhD, C-FNP; Barbara Reid, RN, BSN
Purpose This descriptive pilot study tested a hardiness training model (HTM) among nurse managers (NMs). Using a longitudinal approach (12 months), effectiveness of the model was determined by measures of stress and hardiness (comprised of commitment, control, challenge), and evaluation of staff turnover rates. Sample: A convenience sample of 13 NMs was recruited from an urban North Texas hospital. Outlier problems resulted in a final N=12. Methods: Initial content of the HTM was implemented over a 2.5-day session, including pre/post-testing. Instrumentation included demographics, Hardiness Scale, and Perceived Stress Scale. Additional sessions (2 hours each) ensued weekly for 6-weeks, at 6 and 12 months, followed by post-testing (total of 4 post-tests). Turnover rates were compared for 6 months prior to and following the HTM. Findings: Change in initial hardiness scores were significant (.05). Post-test 2 (6 weeks), evidenced no change in hardiness scores. Post-test 3 (6 months) hardiness scores were significantly lower, but only in one subscale (control). Post-test 4 revealed no changes in hardiness scores. However, loss of two NMs from the agency caused significant skewing of data, so post-test 4 data was eliminated from final analyses. Change in stress scores was not significant. However, a significant inverse relationship was found between hardiness and stress. Turnover rates decreased an average of 63%. Conclusions: Hardiness scores may be improved and sustained through use of a HTM. High hardy NMs could predictably perceive less stress; an HTM may contribute to reduced turnover rates among staff. Among nurse managers, an HTM longer than 6-9 months may prove difficult. Implications: Use of a HTM may increase hardiness among managers/staff thus reducing stress and increasing productivity and job satisfaction. Hardiness training may also reduce vacancies as staff feel empowered and committed to the organization thus creating a work environment that will attract and retain staff.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping a Healthy Workforce: Does Hardiness Training Make a Differenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151489-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing a Healthy Workforce: Does Hardiness Training Make a Difference</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Judkins, Sharon Kay, RN, PhD, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Arlington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">director, nursing administration program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judkins@uta.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leslie Furlow, RN, PhD, C-FNP; Barbara Reid, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose This descriptive pilot study tested a hardiness training model (HTM) among nurse managers (NMs). Using a longitudinal approach (12 months), effectiveness of the model was determined by measures of stress and hardiness (comprised of commitment, control, challenge), and evaluation of staff turnover rates. Sample: A convenience sample of 13 NMs was recruited from an urban North Texas hospital. Outlier problems resulted in a final N=12. Methods: Initial content of the HTM was implemented over a 2.5-day session, including pre/post-testing. Instrumentation included demographics, Hardiness Scale, and Perceived Stress Scale. Additional sessions (2 hours each) ensued weekly for 6-weeks, at 6 and 12 months, followed by post-testing (total of 4 post-tests). Turnover rates were compared for 6 months prior to and following the HTM. Findings: Change in initial hardiness scores were significant (.05). Post-test 2 (6 weeks), evidenced no change in hardiness scores. Post-test 3 (6 months) hardiness scores were significantly lower, but only in one subscale (control). Post-test 4 revealed no changes in hardiness scores. However, loss of two NMs from the agency caused significant skewing of data, so post-test 4 data was eliminated from final analyses. Change in stress scores was not significant. However, a significant inverse relationship was found between hardiness and stress. Turnover rates decreased an average of 63%. Conclusions: Hardiness scores may be improved and sustained through use of a HTM. High hardy NMs could predictably perceive less stress; an HTM may contribute to reduced turnover rates among staff. Among nurse managers, an HTM longer than 6-9 months may prove difficult. Implications: Use of a HTM may increase hardiness among managers/staff thus reducing stress and increasing productivity and job satisfaction. Hardiness training may also reduce vacancies as staff feel empowered and committed to the organization thus creating a work environment that will attract and retain staff.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:04:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:04:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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