Nursing Curriculum: Changing StudentsÆ Knowledge and Biases Towards Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151490
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Curriculum: Changing StudentsÆ Knowledge and Biases Towards Older Adults
Abstract:
Nursing Curriculum: Changing StudentsÆ Knowledge and Biases Towards Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Parchment, Yvonne, EdD, ARNP, MSN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:Florida International University
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
The population of the elderly continues to grow at a phenomenal rate. By the year 2050, 20.4% of the United States population will be 65 years and older compared to 4% in 1900 (National Center for Health Statistics, 2001; Swanson & Nye, 1997). This growing elder population will result in a growing need for health-related services such as assistance with activities of daily living and health promotion and prevention. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2000) stated that, in the United States, over 48% of hospital patients, 80% of homecare patients and 85% of nursing home residents are elderly; therefore, health care professionals must be prepared to meet the health care needs of this population. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine if a course segment on aging would affect the knowledge and biases of nursing students towards the older adult. Method: Quasi experimental design. Junior students in the experimental group received the class segment on aging with the enhancement before going to the introduction to their clinical experiences. The control group received the class without enhancements. All the junior nursing students were surveyed before and after the nursing course using Palmore's Facts on Aging Quiz that is structured to determine individuals' knowledge and biases towards the older adult. Findings: The experimental group showed improved attitudes over baseline compared to the control group. Analysis of the data supported the hypothesis that a course segment on aging would affect the knowledge level of the students and result in changes of their biases toward the older adult. Discussion: Nursing students bring to the profession their knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of the older adult. When negative biases persist after completing a nursing program, and the lack in knowledge about the elderly is not corrected, nursing care will be adversely affected.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Curriculum: Changing StudentsÆ Knowledge and Biases Towards Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151490-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Curriculum: Changing Students&AElig; Knowledge and Biases Towards Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Parchment, Yvonne, EdD, ARNP, MSN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida International University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">parchmen@fiu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The population of the elderly continues to grow at a phenomenal rate. By the year 2050, 20.4% of the United States population will be 65 years and older compared to 4% in 1900 (National Center for Health Statistics, 2001; Swanson &amp; Nye, 1997). This growing elder population will result in a growing need for health-related services such as assistance with activities of daily living and health promotion and prevention. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2000) stated that, in the United States, over 48% of hospital patients, 80% of homecare patients and 85% of nursing home residents are elderly; therefore, health care professionals must be prepared to meet the health care needs of this population. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine if a course segment on aging would affect the knowledge and biases of nursing students towards the older adult. Method: Quasi experimental design. Junior students in the experimental group received the class segment on aging with the enhancement before going to the introduction to their clinical experiences. The control group received the class without enhancements. All the junior nursing students were surveyed before and after the nursing course using Palmore's Facts on Aging Quiz that is structured to determine individuals' knowledge and biases towards the older adult. Findings: The experimental group showed improved attitudes over baseline compared to the control group. Analysis of the data supported the hypothesis that a course segment on aging would affect the knowledge level of the students and result in changes of their biases toward the older adult. Discussion: Nursing students bring to the profession their knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of the older adult. When negative biases persist after completing a nursing program, and the lack in knowledge about the elderly is not corrected, nursing care will be adversely affected.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:04:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:04:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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