2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151493
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of September 11 on an Afghan Community and WomenÆs Participation
Abstract:
Impact of September 11 on an Afghan Community and WomenÆs Participation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lindgren, Teri G., RN, MPH, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
September 11th dramatically affected the world but especially Americans as it engendered anxiety and insecurity. Post 9/11 research has documented increased mental health problems, especially among those proximate to the sites of destruction, but little research has determined the outcomes of this event on those less directly impacted. Additionally, there is limited research that has used communities as a unit of analysis and no published research to date that has investigated the impact of this history changing event on individuals or communities affected due to their religious and/or cultural heritage, such as the San Francisco Bay area Afghan refugees. The Impact of September 11th emerged as a major theme from an ethnographic study exploring Afghan women's experiences and outcomes of community participation using Transition Theory as a conceptual framework to investigate change. A pilot study conducted before September 11th provided a view of Afghan women's pre 9/11 participatory practices. Data collection included prolonged participant observation (1.5 years), informal and formal interviews and a variety of written and media documentation. September 11th significantly disrupted the Afghan community, initiating a major transition described through three phases: Initial shock, Regrouping and Returning to center. This event demonstrated the vulnerabilities and strengths of the community and participating Afghan women. Local Afghans experienced fear, stress and a resurgence of mental health problems but the fall of the Taliban seemed to galvanize this community, giving them a focus for their energy and desires. Afghan women's participation was critical in the community's response to 9/11 as it provided much needed social capital for the community. However, as the community is returning to a more stable place, the gains made in social capital early in the crisis are being challenged and the community's future is uncertain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of September 11 on an Afghan Community and WomenÆs Participationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151493-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of September 11 on an Afghan Community and Women&AElig;s Participation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lindgren, Teri G., RN, MPH, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tlindgr@itsa.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">September 11th dramatically affected the world but especially Americans as it engendered anxiety and insecurity. Post 9/11 research has documented increased mental health problems, especially among those proximate to the sites of destruction, but little research has determined the outcomes of this event on those less directly impacted. Additionally, there is limited research that has used communities as a unit of analysis and no published research to date that has investigated the impact of this history changing event on individuals or communities affected due to their religious and/or cultural heritage, such as the San Francisco Bay area Afghan refugees. The Impact of September 11th emerged as a major theme from an ethnographic study exploring Afghan women's experiences and outcomes of community participation using Transition Theory as a conceptual framework to investigate change. A pilot study conducted before September 11th provided a view of Afghan women's pre 9/11 participatory practices. Data collection included prolonged participant observation (1.5 years), informal and formal interviews and a variety of written and media documentation. September 11th significantly disrupted the Afghan community, initiating a major transition described through three phases: Initial shock, Regrouping and Returning to center. This event demonstrated the vulnerabilities and strengths of the community and participating Afghan women. Local Afghans experienced fear, stress and a resurgence of mental health problems but the fall of the Taliban seemed to galvanize this community, giving them a focus for their energy and desires. Afghan women's participation was critical in the community's response to 9/11 as it provided much needed social capital for the community. However, as the community is returning to a more stable place, the gains made in social capital early in the crisis are being challenged and the community's future is uncertain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:04:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:04:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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