2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151503
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Early Outcomes in Hispanics With Diabetes
Abstract:
Predictors of Early Outcomes in Hispanics With Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Latham, Chris, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Fullerton
Title:Director of Extramural Funding
Co-Authors:Evelyn Calvillo, RN, DNSc
The specific aim of this predictive, correlational study was to test a culturally sensitive diabetes-specific health protection model to determine predictors of successful diabetes management in a newly diagnosed, Type 2, low-income Hispanic population. Using a newly developed Hispanic Health Protection Model (HHPM) as a framework, 240 adult participants with low levels of acculturation, strong beliefs about illness attribution and control of health, and low literacy levels were interviewed in a three-phase process over four to six months. The data analysis resulted in an 11-variable composite model developed from four partial structural equation models, and included lifestyle profile, acculturation, health beliefs, professional and social support, self-efficacy, diabetes knowledge, quality (self-satisfaction and impact of diabetes), and changes in hemoglobina1c and body mass index. The study established new uses for carefully translated measures that held up to strong psychometric evaluation. There was support for the HHPM for this population, and the results suggest future intervention with strengthening enablers, such as professional support and diabetes self-efficacy in relation to this group's health beliefs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Early Outcomes in Hispanics With Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151503-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Early Outcomes in Hispanics With Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Latham, Chris, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Fullerton</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Extramural Funding</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">clatham@fullerton.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Evelyn Calvillo, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The specific aim of this predictive, correlational study was to test a culturally sensitive diabetes-specific health protection model to determine predictors of successful diabetes management in a newly diagnosed, Type 2, low-income Hispanic population. Using a newly developed Hispanic Health Protection Model (HHPM) as a framework, 240 adult participants with low levels of acculturation, strong beliefs about illness attribution and control of health, and low literacy levels were interviewed in a three-phase process over four to six months. The data analysis resulted in an 11-variable composite model developed from four partial structural equation models, and included lifestyle profile, acculturation, health beliefs, professional and social support, self-efficacy, diabetes knowledge, quality (self-satisfaction and impact of diabetes), and changes in hemoglobina1c and body mass index. The study established new uses for carefully translated measures that held up to strong psychometric evaluation. There was support for the HHPM for this population, and the results suggest future intervention with strengthening enablers, such as professional support and diabetes self-efficacy in relation to this group's health beliefs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:04:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:04:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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