2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151508
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Leading to Withdrawal From a Nursing Program
Abstract:
Factors Leading to Withdrawal From a Nursing Program
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Thompson, Kate, MS, MPH, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii Manoa
Title:Academic Adviser
Co-Authors:Lois A. Magnussen, EdD, APRN
This study examined the lived experience of students who withdrew from nursing school. A phenomenological qualitative research design was used. A convenience sample of ten students were interviewed individually, in a school meeting room. Inclusion criteria were: (a) had attended nursing school at U.H.M. (b) had withdrawn from nursing school (c) willing to be interviewed. Methodology: unstructured phenomenological interviews were conducted with the researcher asking the participant to talk about his/her experience as a nursing student with a particular focus on the experiences that lead to his/her withdrawal from nursing school. Data analyzed according to the Colaizzi (1978) method of phenomenological data analysis. Study Findings: Four major theme clusters emerged from the data: a feeling of the initial excitement when starting the program; experiencing the reality of nursing school; making the decision to withdraw; and finding a new life. The participants talked about: nursing in the æreal world', feeling personally unsuited for nursing, feeling stressed, strained relationships with faculty, strained relationships with family, academics, concerns about long term job satisfaction, financial concerns, strained relationships with significant others, culture and gender issues and health concerns. Conclusions: The decision to leave the nursing program is stressful. The investment of time, effort, and money leading to the goal of being a nurse has been significant. Cutting their losses and moving on, out of nursing, becomes the new goal. The participants interviewed said it took about six months to reformulate a new direction for their career life. Implications for Nursing: A certain amount of attrition in any professional program is expected. With the nursing profession, there is additional stress, which polarizes students away from or toward the nursing profession. *This study was supported by a grant from Sigma Theta Tau, Gamma Psi Chapter and the U.H.M. President's Diversity and Equity Intiative.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Leading to Withdrawal From a Nursing Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151508-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Leading to Withdrawal From a Nursing Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thompson, Kate, MS, MPH, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii Manoa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Academic Adviser</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">katet@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lois A. Magnussen, EdD, APRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study examined the lived experience of students who withdrew from nursing school. A phenomenological qualitative research design was used. A convenience sample of ten students were interviewed individually, in a school meeting room. Inclusion criteria were: (a) had attended nursing school at U.H.M. (b) had withdrawn from nursing school (c) willing to be interviewed. Methodology: unstructured phenomenological interviews were conducted with the researcher asking the participant to talk about his/her experience as a nursing student with a particular focus on the experiences that lead to his/her withdrawal from nursing school. Data analyzed according to the Colaizzi (1978) method of phenomenological data analysis. Study Findings: Four major theme clusters emerged from the data: a feeling of the initial excitement when starting the program; experiencing the reality of nursing school; making the decision to withdraw; and finding a new life. The participants talked about: nursing in the &aelig;real world', feeling personally unsuited for nursing, feeling stressed, strained relationships with faculty, strained relationships with family, academics, concerns about long term job satisfaction, financial concerns, strained relationships with significant others, culture and gender issues and health concerns. Conclusions: The decision to leave the nursing program is stressful. The investment of time, effort, and money leading to the goal of being a nurse has been significant. Cutting their losses and moving on, out of nursing, becomes the new goal. The participants interviewed said it took about six months to reformulate a new direction for their career life. Implications for Nursing: A certain amount of attrition in any professional program is expected. With the nursing profession, there is additional stress, which polarizes students away from or toward the nursing profession. *This study was supported by a grant from Sigma Theta Tau, Gamma Psi Chapter and the U.H.M. President's Diversity and Equity Intiative.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:04:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:04:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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