2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151513
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Job Satisfaction of Nurses at 6, 12, and 18 Months Post-Hire
Abstract:
Job Satisfaction of Nurses at 6, 12, and 18 Months Post-Hire
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Carlisle, Joan Burttram, DSN, CRNP, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Health System
Title:Director, Nursing Education & Research
Co-Authors:Paige Stephenson, RNC
Nursing literature is rich in documenting the link between job satisfaction and retention. Various studies have indicated that improved wage and benefits, higher status of nurses, better staffing and more respect from management would be important in improving retention. A research study was conducted with newly hired nurses at Children's Health System (CHS). The purpose of this descriptive, cross sectional study was to determine registered nurses' perceptions of job satisfaction during their first eighteen months of employment. Additionally, data were examined to determine if there were differences in nurses' perceptions at 6 months, 12 months and 18 months post-hire and what factors influenced nurses' perceptions of job satisfaction. Forty-four of the 99 mailed surveys were returned. Forty-three of the nurses were satisfied or very satisfied with their job; only 1 was dissatisfied. Due to lack of variability in responses, there were no significant differences among the study variables. Content analysis of comments revealed that these nurses have concerns that are consistent with those in the literature. With cautious interpretation due to sample size, factor analysis revealed 5 factors associated with overall satisfaction: satisfaction with supervisors, knowledge and skills, resources, mutual respect and communication between supervisors and staff. The nurses at 6 months were more likely to agree with the statements related to have the information needed to perform the job, able to participate in professional development of interest to them, and accepted by members of the team than were the nurses who had been employed for 12 or 18 months. Acute care nurses were more likely to agree with statements regarding mutual respect than were critical care nurses. Recommendations include replication of the study for a larger sample, comparing new-hires to all nurse employees and examining a cohort of new graduates during the first 18 months of employment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleJob Satisfaction of Nurses at 6, 12, and 18 Months Post-Hireen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151513-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Job Satisfaction of Nurses at 6, 12, and 18 Months Post-Hire</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carlisle, Joan Burttram, DSN, CRNP, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, Nursing Education &amp; Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Joan.Carlisle@chsys.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Paige Stephenson, RNC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing literature is rich in documenting the link between job satisfaction and retention. Various studies have indicated that improved wage and benefits, higher status of nurses, better staffing and more respect from management would be important in improving retention. A research study was conducted with newly hired nurses at Children's Health System (CHS). The purpose of this descriptive, cross sectional study was to determine registered nurses' perceptions of job satisfaction during their first eighteen months of employment. Additionally, data were examined to determine if there were differences in nurses' perceptions at 6 months, 12 months and 18 months post-hire and what factors influenced nurses' perceptions of job satisfaction. Forty-four of the 99 mailed surveys were returned. Forty-three of the nurses were satisfied or very satisfied with their job; only 1 was dissatisfied. Due to lack of variability in responses, there were no significant differences among the study variables. Content analysis of comments revealed that these nurses have concerns that are consistent with those in the literature. With cautious interpretation due to sample size, factor analysis revealed 5 factors associated with overall satisfaction: satisfaction with supervisors, knowledge and skills, resources, mutual respect and communication between supervisors and staff. The nurses at 6 months were more likely to agree with the statements related to have the information needed to perform the job, able to participate in professional development of interest to them, and accepted by members of the team than were the nurses who had been employed for 12 or 18 months. Acute care nurses were more likely to agree with statements regarding mutual respect than were critical care nurses. Recommendations include replication of the study for a larger sample, comparing new-hires to all nurse employees and examining a cohort of new graduates during the first 18 months of employment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:04:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:04:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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