Recruitment and Retention of Rural Women Into Research Protocols: Lessons Learned

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151521
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment and Retention of Rural Women Into Research Protocols: Lessons Learned
Abstract:
Recruitment and Retention of Rural Women Into Research Protocols: Lessons Learned
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:McCrone, Susan H., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:West Virginia University
Title:associate professor
Co-Authors:Irene A. Tessaro, DrPH
Successful recruitment and retention of eligible and willing subjects is essential to any research study but is especially challenging with rural adults. The results of recruitment and retention efforts are influenced by a number of factors: the nature of the study, the recruitment and retention strategies employed, and the target population. Few studies have examined the challenges of recruiting and retaining rural women into research. The purpose of this presentation is to explore the lessons learned from the recruitment and retention of a sample of rural women into an intervention study to decrease cardiovascular risk factors. Recruitment strategies began at the community level with health centers and ended with individual subject recruitment and retention. Women (n = 789) ages 40-64 in 8 health centers in rural West Virginia were approached to participate in this study which involved interviews at baseline and six-months. Fifty-three percent (n = 418) agreed to participate and were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Of the people agreeing to participate, 395 (50%) provided complete data. Sixty-six percent (n = 262) were retained in the study. A comparison of characteristics between completers and non-completers indicated no differences in age, marital status, income, employment, or overall health status. Significant differences (p. = 0.01) occurred on two variables: women who smoked or ever had a diagnosis of cancer had significantly higher dropout rates. Only diagnosis of cancer independently explained non-retention. The greatest challenge was obtaining the follow-up data through phone interviews hence additional incentives were provided for returning the surveys by mail. Successful strategies included: creation of a culturally sensitive intervention from recommendations of focus groups in the communities, endorsement by community advisory boards, education and incentives for clinic staffs, utilization of nursing students familiar with the communities of interest, and patient incentives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment and Retention of Rural Women Into Research Protocols: Lessons Learneden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151521-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recruitment and Retention of Rural Women Into Research Protocols: Lessons Learned</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCrone, Susan H., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">West Virginia University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">associate professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smccrone@hsc.wvu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Irene A. Tessaro, DrPH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Successful recruitment and retention of eligible and willing subjects is essential to any research study but is especially challenging with rural adults. The results of recruitment and retention efforts are influenced by a number of factors: the nature of the study, the recruitment and retention strategies employed, and the target population. Few studies have examined the challenges of recruiting and retaining rural women into research. The purpose of this presentation is to explore the lessons learned from the recruitment and retention of a sample of rural women into an intervention study to decrease cardiovascular risk factors. Recruitment strategies began at the community level with health centers and ended with individual subject recruitment and retention. Women (n = 789) ages 40-64 in 8 health centers in rural West Virginia were approached to participate in this study which involved interviews at baseline and six-months. Fifty-three percent (n = 418) agreed to participate and were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Of the people agreeing to participate, 395 (50%) provided complete data. Sixty-six percent (n = 262) were retained in the study. A comparison of characteristics between completers and non-completers indicated no differences in age, marital status, income, employment, or overall health status. Significant differences (p. = 0.01) occurred on two variables: women who smoked or ever had a diagnosis of cancer had significantly higher dropout rates. Only diagnosis of cancer independently explained non-retention. The greatest challenge was obtaining the follow-up data through phone interviews hence additional incentives were provided for returning the surveys by mail. Successful strategies included: creation of a culturally sensitive intervention from recommendations of focus groups in the communities, endorsement by community advisory boards, education and incentives for clinic staffs, utilization of nursing students familiar with the communities of interest, and patient incentives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:05:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:05:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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