2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151527
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring the Meaning of Spirituality With Aging Adults in Appalachia
Abstract:
Exploring the Meaning of Spirituality With Aging Adults in Appalachia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lowry, Lois W., DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:East Tennessee State University
Title:Professor
The purposes of this qualitative study were to explore the meaning of the lived experience of spirituality in the lives of aging adults in various states of health, and to compare the emergent themes with the Neuman Systems Model conceptualizations of spirituality. The study design was a phenomenological inquiry based upon the Heideggerian approach that acknowledges researcher perspectives a priori. In this case the researcher had accepted the definitions of spirituality as rendered by Betty Neuman. Participants were 40 adults, ranging in age from 65 to 93 years, who volunteered to take part in focus group interviews to discuss spirituality. One third of the participants were well elderly, one third resided in assisted living facilities, and one third lived in skilled nursing facilities. Group interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed; and then interpreted using van Manen's method of analysis. Three themes about spirituality emerged from the data: a conviction that God exists and acts in the lives of persons; a call to action; and, a connection with God and others leads to a sense of well-being during times of loss and crisis. For these participants spirituality was an important value that increased in importance as health declined and losses were experienced. The significant statements about the meaning of spirituality extracted from the data were congruent with the definitions given by Neuman; thus, lending credibility to the spiritual variable. These findings imply that spirituality is a core component of persons. Nurses, as caregivers, and promoters of health and well-being must acknowledge the importance of spirituality through assessments and planned intervention to attain, maintain and retain health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring the Meaning of Spirituality With Aging Adults in Appalachiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151527-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring the Meaning of Spirituality With Aging Adults in Appalachia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lowry, Lois W., DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">East Tennessee State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">doclowry@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purposes of this qualitative study were to explore the meaning of the lived experience of spirituality in the lives of aging adults in various states of health, and to compare the emergent themes with the Neuman Systems Model conceptualizations of spirituality. The study design was a phenomenological inquiry based upon the Heideggerian approach that acknowledges researcher perspectives a priori. In this case the researcher had accepted the definitions of spirituality as rendered by Betty Neuman. Participants were 40 adults, ranging in age from 65 to 93 years, who volunteered to take part in focus group interviews to discuss spirituality. One third of the participants were well elderly, one third resided in assisted living facilities, and one third lived in skilled nursing facilities. Group interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed; and then interpreted using van Manen's method of analysis. Three themes about spirituality emerged from the data: a conviction that God exists and acts in the lives of persons; a call to action; and, a connection with God and others leads to a sense of well-being during times of loss and crisis. For these participants spirituality was an important value that increased in importance as health declined and losses were experienced. The significant statements about the meaning of spirituality extracted from the data were congruent with the definitions given by Neuman; thus, lending credibility to the spiritual variable. These findings imply that spirituality is a core component of persons. Nurses, as caregivers, and promoters of health and well-being must acknowledge the importance of spirituality through assessments and planned intervention to attain, maintain and retain health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:05:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:05:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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