Cognitive Beliefs and Intentions to Be Physically Active and Eat a Healthy Diet Among Adults at Risk for Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151530
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Beliefs and Intentions to Be Physically Active and Eat a Healthy Diet Among Adults at Risk for Diabetes
Abstract:
Cognitive Beliefs and Intentions to Be Physically Active and Eat a Healthy Diet Among Adults at Risk for Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Blue, Carolyn L., RN, PhD, CHES
P.I. Institution Name:The University of North Carolina Greensboro
Title:Professor
Diabetes is increasing and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. An additional 47 million Americans have pre-diabetes. Physical activity and healthy diet can delay or prevent diabetes. Thus, persons at risk for diabetes are an important group to target. When beliefs related to these behaviors are known, interventions can be developed to modify beliefs as a mechanism for improving physical activity and diet. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, perceived diabetes risk, and intentions to be physically active and eat a healthy diet. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was the conceptual framework. Community-dwelling adults (n=106) who met American Diabetes Association diabetes risk criteria completed a questionnaire that included scales to measure TPB constructs (i.e., attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, and intention) for physical activity and healthy eating and perceived risk for diabetes. Most (68.8%) were female, Caucasian (71.9%), married (71.9%), from 31 to 71 years and older, and 40.6% were 41 to 50 years old. Mean body mass index was 34.0 (SD = 9.3). Structural equation modeling revealed a good fit of the data to two models: 1) intention to be physically active and 2) intention to eat a healthy diet. The variance explained in intention to be physically active was 63%. Subjective norm and perceived behavioral control, but not attitude or diabetes risk, influenced intention to be physically active. The variance explained in intention to eat a healthy diet by the TPB and diabetes risk variables was 74.7%. Attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control, but not diabetes risk, influenced intention to eat a healthy diet. The TPB was predictive of intentions to be physically active and eat a healthy diet. Perceived diabetes risk was not predictive of intentions to carry out either of the two behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Beliefs and Intentions to Be Physically Active and Eat a Healthy Diet Among Adults at Risk for Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151530-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Beliefs and Intentions to Be Physically Active and Eat a Healthy Diet Among Adults at Risk for Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blue, Carolyn L., RN, PhD, CHES</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of North Carolina Greensboro</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">clblue2@uncg.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Diabetes is increasing and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. An additional 47 million Americans have pre-diabetes. Physical activity and healthy diet can delay or prevent diabetes. Thus, persons at risk for diabetes are an important group to target. When beliefs related to these behaviors are known, interventions can be developed to modify beliefs as a mechanism for improving physical activity and diet. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, perceived diabetes risk, and intentions to be physically active and eat a healthy diet. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was the conceptual framework. Community-dwelling adults (n=106) who met American Diabetes Association diabetes risk criteria completed a questionnaire that included scales to measure TPB constructs (i.e., attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, and intention) for physical activity and healthy eating and perceived risk for diabetes. Most (68.8%) were female, Caucasian (71.9%), married (71.9%), from 31 to 71 years and older, and 40.6% were 41 to 50 years old. Mean body mass index was 34.0 (SD = 9.3). Structural equation modeling revealed a good fit of the data to two models: 1) intention to be physically active and 2) intention to eat a healthy diet. The variance explained in intention to be physically active was 63%. Subjective norm and perceived behavioral control, but not attitude or diabetes risk, influenced intention to be physically active. The variance explained in intention to eat a healthy diet by the TPB and diabetes risk variables was 74.7%. Attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control, but not diabetes risk, influenced intention to eat a healthy diet. The TPB was predictive of intentions to be physically active and eat a healthy diet. Perceived diabetes risk was not predictive of intentions to carry out either of the two behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:05:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:05:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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