A Meta-Analysis of Exercise Interventions to Improve Physical Function Among People Treated for Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151535
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Meta-Analysis of Exercise Interventions to Improve Physical Function Among People Treated for Cancer
Abstract:
A Meta-Analysis of Exercise Interventions to Improve Physical Function Among People Treated for Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Conn, Vicki, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri
Title:Associate Dean
Co-Authors:Roxanne McDaniel, PhD, RN; Paul J. Nielsen,
Objectives: This review applied meta-analytic procedures to integrate primary research findings that tested exercise interventions to improve physical function among people treated for cancer. Methods: Extensive literature searching strategies located published and unpublished intervention studies that tested exercise interventions with at least 5 participants. Primary study results were coded. Meta-analytic procedures were conducted using random effects models. Analyses were conducted separately for two- and single-group design studies. Single-group analyses were conducted under assumptions of null (0) and strong associations (.80) between pre and post scores. Results: The statistically significant overall weighted mean effect size for two-group comparisons was .52 (variance = .23) for physical function. Single group analysis documented a significant mean effect of .70 (variance = .29) for the assumption of no association and a mean effect of .72 (variance = .42) for the assumption of high association. Effect sizes among control group participants were essentially 0. Moderator analyses revealed effect sizes were larger among predominantly breast cancer samples and in studies that used supervised exercise but did not include exercise prescription or fitness testing. Effect sizes were similar when interventions were conducted concurrently with cancer treatment or following treatment. Conclusions: Exercise interventions resulted in positive effects on physical function among adults currently or recently treated for cancer. Future research should examine intervention specific characteristics such as dose that result in optimal results.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Meta-Analysis of Exercise Interventions to Improve Physical Function Among People Treated for Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151535-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Meta-Analysis of Exercise Interventions to Improve Physical Function Among People Treated for Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Conn, Vicki, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">conn@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Roxanne McDaniel, PhD, RN; Paul J. Nielsen,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: This review applied meta-analytic procedures to integrate primary research findings that tested exercise interventions to improve physical function among people treated for cancer. Methods: Extensive literature searching strategies located published and unpublished intervention studies that tested exercise interventions with at least 5 participants. Primary study results were coded. Meta-analytic procedures were conducted using random effects models. Analyses were conducted separately for two- and single-group design studies. Single-group analyses were conducted under assumptions of null (0) and strong associations (.80) between pre and post scores. Results: The statistically significant overall weighted mean effect size for two-group comparisons was .52 (variance = .23) for physical function. Single group analysis documented a significant mean effect of .70 (variance = .29) for the assumption of no association and a mean effect of .72 (variance = .42) for the assumption of high association. Effect sizes among control group participants were essentially 0. Moderator analyses revealed effect sizes were larger among predominantly breast cancer samples and in studies that used supervised exercise but did not include exercise prescription or fitness testing. Effect sizes were similar when interventions were conducted concurrently with cancer treatment or following treatment. Conclusions: Exercise interventions resulted in positive effects on physical function among adults currently or recently treated for cancer. Future research should examine intervention specific characteristics such as dose that result in optimal results.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:05:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:05:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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