Abnormal Patient Vital Signs in the Emergency Department: Clinicians' Responses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151538
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Abnormal Patient Vital Signs in the Emergency Department: Clinicians' Responses
Abstract:
Abnormal Patient Vital Signs in the Emergency Department: Clinicians' Responses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wilkes, Lesley M., PhD, MHPEd, GradDip, ED, CM, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wentworth Area Health Service
Title:Acting Dean, College of Social & Health Sciences, University of Western Sydney
Co-Authors:Jane Cioffi, RN, BSC, MAS; Cate Salter, RN; Janet Scott, RN; Oana Vonu-Boriceanu, BA
Clinicians' responses to abnormal vital signs have been identified as a significant reason for delaying clinical management in Emergency department practice, jeopardising patient safety. Recognition of abnormal patient vital signs and subsequent action involves clinical judgement and decision-making. This has been minimally explored in the Emergency department. This study aimed to explore and describe clinicians' experiences of responding to patients with abnormal vital signs in the Emergency department. A qualitative approach was used and three focus group interviews were conducted with a mixed group of nine registered nurses and seven doctors working in the Emergency department in an area health service in Western Sydney. Transcribed interviews were managed with NVivo software program which assisted in coding and sorting of coded segments of the text and in analysis. Written descriptions of clinicians' responses to changes in vital signs in patients in the Emergency unit were written and distributed to participants to examine credibility and to a panel of six expert Emergency department clinicians to check fittingness. Findings from focus group discussion are described under the following main categories: Avoiding abnormal vital signs due to lack of knowledge; apathy of senior staff; flaws in education for emergency care; resistance of junior staff to approach senior staff and, workload issues and short staffing. Implication of the findings for clinicians in Emergency department practice will be elaborated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAbnormal Patient Vital Signs in the Emergency Department: Clinicians' Responsesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151538-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Abnormal Patient Vital Signs in the Emergency Department: Clinicians' Responses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilkes, Lesley M., PhD, MHPEd, GradDip, ED, CM, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wentworth Area Health Service</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Acting Dean, College of Social &amp; Health Sciences, University of Western Sydney</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcmanua@wahs.nsw.gov.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jane Cioffi, RN, BSC, MAS; Cate Salter, RN; Janet Scott, RN; Oana Vonu-Boriceanu, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinicians' responses to abnormal vital signs have been identified as a significant reason for delaying clinical management in Emergency department practice, jeopardising patient safety. Recognition of abnormal patient vital signs and subsequent action involves clinical judgement and decision-making. This has been minimally explored in the Emergency department. This study aimed to explore and describe clinicians' experiences of responding to patients with abnormal vital signs in the Emergency department. A qualitative approach was used and three focus group interviews were conducted with a mixed group of nine registered nurses and seven doctors working in the Emergency department in an area health service in Western Sydney. Transcribed interviews were managed with NVivo software program which assisted in coding and sorting of coded segments of the text and in analysis. Written descriptions of clinicians' responses to changes in vital signs in patients in the Emergency unit were written and distributed to participants to examine credibility and to a panel of six expert Emergency department clinicians to check fittingness. Findings from focus group discussion are described under the following main categories: Avoiding abnormal vital signs due to lack of knowledge; apathy of senior staff; flaws in education for emergency care; resistance of junior staff to approach senior staff and, workload issues and short staffing. Implication of the findings for clinicians in Emergency department practice will be elaborated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:05:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:05:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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