2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151558
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Students' Perceptions and Knowledge of Infection Control Issues
Abstract:
Nursing Students' Perceptions and Knowledge of Infection Control Issues
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Walker, Jean T., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Mississippi Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Tina M. Martin, RN, MSN, CFNP
The objective of this study is to identify what first year baccalaureate nursing students perceive related to infection control predominantly handwashing. The sample consisted of eighty-three first year baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in an undergraduate 4-year program in a southern state in America during the Fall 2004 semester. Students were given a nine-item pre-test and then presented a didactic lecture on medical asepsis and handwashing. A post-test was performed to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Pre-and post-tests results were compared and chi-square performed to determine if there were any significant differences between pre- and post test groups. Results indicated that 31.3% (n=26) of the students were unaware alcohol-based handrubs are recommended for use by health care personnel to improve adherence to hand hygiene and 44.6% (n=37) believed that alcohol-based handrubs caused excessive skin irritation and dryness. Post-test analysis after didactic lecture revealed a significant improvement (p <0.001) in knowledge of effectiveness of alcohol based handrubs (96.4%). In addition, 19.3% (n=16) did not know that a nosocomial infection is a hospital acquired infection whereas after lecture 100% were able to identify a nosocomial infection as a hospital acquired infection. Conclusions: Data demonstrate insight into students' perceptions and knowledge of hand hygiene. There was a significant difference in nursing students' awareness of CDC approved techniques for hand hygiene. This study enhances the understanding of students' knowledge and perceptions of infection control issues and may help educators understand behaviors by nursing students that may be related to misconceptions and noncompliance in handwashing practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Students' Perceptions and Knowledge of Infection Control Issuesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151558-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Students' Perceptions and Knowledge of Infection Control Issues</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walker, Jean T., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Mississippi Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jwalker@son.umsmed.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tina M. Martin, RN, MSN, CFNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The objective of this study is to identify what first year baccalaureate nursing students perceive related to infection control predominantly handwashing. The sample consisted of eighty-three first year baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in an undergraduate 4-year program in a southern state in America during the Fall 2004 semester. Students were given a nine-item pre-test and then presented a didactic lecture on medical asepsis and handwashing. A post-test was performed to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Pre-and post-tests results were compared and chi-square performed to determine if there were any significant differences between pre- and post test groups. Results indicated that 31.3% (n=26) of the students were unaware alcohol-based handrubs are recommended for use by health care personnel to improve adherence to hand hygiene and 44.6% (n=37) believed that alcohol-based handrubs caused excessive skin irritation and dryness. Post-test analysis after didactic lecture revealed a significant improvement (p &lt;0.001) in knowledge of effectiveness of alcohol based handrubs (96.4%). In addition, 19.3% (n=16) did not know that a nosocomial infection is a hospital acquired infection whereas after lecture 100% were able to identify a nosocomial infection as a hospital acquired infection. Conclusions: Data demonstrate insight into students' perceptions and knowledge of hand hygiene. There was a significant difference in nursing students' awareness of CDC approved techniques for hand hygiene. This study enhances the understanding of students' knowledge and perceptions of infection control issues and may help educators understand behaviors by nursing students that may be related to misconceptions and noncompliance in handwashing practices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:06:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:06:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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