2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151561
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hypertension Beliefs in African Americans
Abstract:
Hypertension Beliefs in African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Coverson, Dorothy, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Emory University
Title:PhD Student
Co-Authors:Ora Strickland, PhD, RN, FAAN
Background: Hypertension (HTN) is at epidemic levels, particularly among African Americans (AAs). Although the exact cause of HTN is unknown, genetics and lifestyle behaviors such as diet and physical activity have been found to be associated with HTN risk and development. Research has shown that AAs engage in nutrition and physical activity practices that place them at increased risk for HTN. However, it is unclear why AAs tend to engage in lifestyle behaviors that place them at increased risk for HTN. Health beliefs regarding HTN are one potential explanation. Purpose: To develop a culturally sensitive measure of beliefs regarding HTN in AAs. Methods: An integrated literature review from 1980-2004 regarding HTN risk and health beliefs regarding HTN was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PSYCHINFO. Results: No culturally sensitive measure of beliefs regarding HTN in AAs was found. A 65-item culturally specific measure, Beliefs Related to High Blood Pressure in African Americans (BRHBPAA), was constructed. The measure was derived from a concept analysis of HTN and HTN risk. The measure contains seven subscales: susceptibility, actions to reduce susceptibility, seriousness, benefits (exercise), barriers (exercise), benefits (nutrition), and barriers (nutrition). Items are scored on a 5-point Likert scale with one indicating ôstrongly disagreeö and five indicating ôstrongly agreeö. Scores are calculated for each subscale. Discussion: Relevant findings from the literature review regarding HTN beliefs and AAs will be discussed. Pilot data on the psychometric properties of the instrument in a sample of 40 AAs will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHypertension Beliefs in African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151561-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hypertension Beliefs in African Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coverson, Dorothy, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emory University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dcovers@emory.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ora Strickland, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Hypertension (HTN) is at epidemic levels, particularly among African Americans (AAs). Although the exact cause of HTN is unknown, genetics and lifestyle behaviors such as diet and physical activity have been found to be associated with HTN risk and development. Research has shown that AAs engage in nutrition and physical activity practices that place them at increased risk for HTN. However, it is unclear why AAs tend to engage in lifestyle behaviors that place them at increased risk for HTN. Health beliefs regarding HTN are one potential explanation. Purpose: To develop a culturally sensitive measure of beliefs regarding HTN in AAs. Methods: An integrated literature review from 1980-2004 regarding HTN risk and health beliefs regarding HTN was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PSYCHINFO. Results: No culturally sensitive measure of beliefs regarding HTN in AAs was found. A 65-item culturally specific measure, Beliefs Related to High Blood Pressure in African Americans (BRHBPAA), was constructed. The measure was derived from a concept analysis of HTN and HTN risk. The measure contains seven subscales: susceptibility, actions to reduce susceptibility, seriousness, benefits (exercise), barriers (exercise), benefits (nutrition), and barriers (nutrition). Items are scored on a 5-point Likert scale with one indicating &ocirc;strongly disagree&ouml; and five indicating &ocirc;strongly agree&ouml;. Scores are calculated for each subscale. Discussion: Relevant findings from the literature review regarding HTN beliefs and AAs will be discussed. Pilot data on the psychometric properties of the instrument in a sample of 40 AAs will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:06:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:06:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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