2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151564
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Concerns Voiced by Alberta Ranch and Farm Families
Abstract:
Health Concerns Voiced by Alberta Ranch and Farm Families
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Edge, Dana, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Calgary
Title:Associate Professor
In spring 2004, a qualitative study was undertaken to explore the health concerns and status of farm and ranch families in Alberta, Canada. Fifteen families over a 300 km wide area in central Alberta were recruited through a snowball technique. Study participants were involved in either farming or ranching activities. Using a structured interview guide, participants were asked about their farming/ranching operations, concerns about health of family and community, changes in health services over time, and whether the participant had any environmental concerns. The taped interviews averaged between 60 to 90 minutes in length and were conducted primarily with women of each family. The mean age of participants was 45.9 years with a range of 28 to 71 years. All were married and the majority of respondents had post-secondary education (67%). Forty percent of women interviewed identified themselves as either a ærancher' or a æfarmer'; the remainder self-identified as being a housewife/partner on a farm/ranch. Using content analysis, the data were classified into relevant themes. Participants reported a variety of health concerns ranging from multiple sclerosis to various cancers. While not planned, the study was conducted during the embargo of Canadian beef sales to the United States due to a case of bovine spongiform encephalitis (BSE). Many of the themes that emerged centered on the effects of the economic crisis upon families' health. Nursing interventions to address the identified issues, as well as the identification of health concerns requiring further epidemiological investigations, are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Concerns Voiced by Alberta Ranch and Farm Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151564-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Concerns Voiced by Alberta Ranch and Farm Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Edge, Dana, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Calgary</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dedge@ucalgary.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In spring 2004, a qualitative study was undertaken to explore the health concerns and status of farm and ranch families in Alberta, Canada. Fifteen families over a 300 km wide area in central Alberta were recruited through a snowball technique. Study participants were involved in either farming or ranching activities. Using a structured interview guide, participants were asked about their farming/ranching operations, concerns about health of family and community, changes in health services over time, and whether the participant had any environmental concerns. The taped interviews averaged between 60 to 90 minutes in length and were conducted primarily with women of each family. The mean age of participants was 45.9 years with a range of 28 to 71 years. All were married and the majority of respondents had post-secondary education (67%). Forty percent of women interviewed identified themselves as either a &aelig;rancher' or a &aelig;farmer'; the remainder self-identified as being a housewife/partner on a farm/ranch. Using content analysis, the data were classified into relevant themes. Participants reported a variety of health concerns ranging from multiple sclerosis to various cancers. While not planned, the study was conducted during the embargo of Canadian beef sales to the United States due to a case of bovine spongiform encephalitis (BSE). Many of the themes that emerged centered on the effects of the economic crisis upon families' health. Nursing interventions to address the identified issues, as well as the identification of health concerns requiring further epidemiological investigations, are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:06:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:06:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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