The Relationship of Work Environment Stressors, Social Support, and Anxiety in Secondary School Teachers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151566
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Work Environment Stressors, Social Support, and Anxiety in Secondary School Teachers
Abstract:
The Relationship of Work Environment Stressors, Social Support, and Anxiety in Secondary School Teachers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Mahan, Pamela Lynn, DSN, MA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Objective: Work environment stressors have become salient health and safety issues for secondary school teachers, and the majority of U.S. workers. The long-term consequences of work environment stress are the undiagnosed and untreated adverse psychological reactions that lead to higher health care costs and decreased productivity. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between work environment stressors, social support, anxiety, and depression in secondary school teachers. Design: The study was a descriptive correlation design. A convenience sample of 168 male and female secondary school teachers from two urban and five suburban high schools in central New Jersey completed the Ongoing and Episodic Stressor Scale, Contents of Communication Scale, the State Anxiety Inventory, and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Variables: The four predictor variables were ongoing and episodic stressors, coworker and supervisor support. The two criterion variables were anxiety and depression. Findings: A variety of ongoing and episodic stressors were positively correlated with anxiety (p < 0.001). Ongoing stressors were the most important predictors of anxiety in secondary school teachers. Coworker support was also significant in explaining anxiety. Higher levels of coworker support was correlated to lower levels of anxiety. Coworker and supervisor support failed to have a significant interaction with episodic and ongoing stressors in explaining anxiety. Conclusion: The findings were consistent with the development of anxiety due to work environment stressors. A work environment that encourages positive communication patterns among coworkers should improve the individual's ability to cope with stressors and reduce anxiety.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Work Environment Stressors, Social Support, and Anxiety in Secondary School Teachersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151566-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Work Environment Stressors, Social Support, and Anxiety in Secondary School Teachers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mahan, Pamela Lynn, DSN, MA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mahanpam@shu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Work environment stressors have become salient health and safety issues for secondary school teachers, and the majority of U.S. workers. The long-term consequences of work environment stress are the undiagnosed and untreated adverse psychological reactions that lead to higher health care costs and decreased productivity. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between work environment stressors, social support, anxiety, and depression in secondary school teachers. Design: The study was a descriptive correlation design. A convenience sample of 168 male and female secondary school teachers from two urban and five suburban high schools in central New Jersey completed the Ongoing and Episodic Stressor Scale, Contents of Communication Scale, the State Anxiety Inventory, and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Variables: The four predictor variables were ongoing and episodic stressors, coworker and supervisor support. The two criterion variables were anxiety and depression. Findings: A variety of ongoing and episodic stressors were positively correlated with anxiety (p &lt; 0.001). Ongoing stressors were the most important predictors of anxiety in secondary school teachers. Coworker support was also significant in explaining anxiety. Higher levels of coworker support was correlated to lower levels of anxiety. Coworker and supervisor support failed to have a significant interaction with episodic and ongoing stressors in explaining anxiety. Conclusion: The findings were consistent with the development of anxiety due to work environment stressors. A work environment that encourages positive communication patterns among coworkers should improve the individual's ability to cope with stressors and reduce anxiety.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:06:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:06:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.