Personal Goals and Values of Family Caregivers of Institutionalized Elders With Dementia at End-of-Life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151578
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Personal Goals and Values of Family Caregivers of Institutionalized Elders With Dementia at End-of-Life
Abstract:
Personal Goals and Values of Family Caregivers of Institutionalized Elders With Dementia at End-of-Life
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Background: Although family caregivers have been studied extensively, little is known about their goals and values surrounding end of life care for their elder with advanced dementia. This study explored how families' goals and values affected their decision-making, and the stressors they experienced when caring for their family member at the end of life. Objective: To explore the personal goals, values and stressors of family caregivers serving as surrogate decision makers for institutionalized cognitively impaired elders near the end of life. Design: Qualitative research using focus groups. Each focus group was guided through a discussion addressing (1) relationships between caregivers and residents, (2) making decisions, (3) the resident's future, (4) goals, (5) beliefs, (6) values, and (7) resolving conflicts. Setting: Nursing homes in Minnesota. Participants: Thirty-nine family members of cognitively impaired nursing home residents. Results: Three major findings emerged from the analysis of the focus group transcripts: (1) Participants described their personal goals and how they attempted to achieve a balance between these personal goals and their goals for the care of their dependent elderly family members. The personal goals were principally in two domains: the caregivers' relationships û both with the elder and with others û and the caregivers' own well-being. (2) The caregivers also described the values that were behind their goals: the most consistently invoked values were love, duty and respect. (3) The participants also described the significant stressors that affected them in their roles as caregivers. These included stress related to guilt over the admission to the nursing home; stress rooted in the ongoing deterioration of their loved one; stress related to conflicts in goals and/or values and stress related to multiple time commitments, family conflicts, and interaction with health care providers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePersonal Goals and Values of Family Caregivers of Institutionalized Elders With Dementia at End-of-Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151578-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Personal Goals and Values of Family Caregivers of Institutionalized Elders With Dementia at End-of-Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">peden001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Although family caregivers have been studied extensively, little is known about their goals and values surrounding end of life care for their elder with advanced dementia. This study explored how families' goals and values affected their decision-making, and the stressors they experienced when caring for their family member at the end of life. Objective: To explore the personal goals, values and stressors of family caregivers serving as surrogate decision makers for institutionalized cognitively impaired elders near the end of life. Design: Qualitative research using focus groups. Each focus group was guided through a discussion addressing (1) relationships between caregivers and residents, (2) making decisions, (3) the resident's future, (4) goals, (5) beliefs, (6) values, and (7) resolving conflicts. Setting: Nursing homes in Minnesota. Participants: Thirty-nine family members of cognitively impaired nursing home residents. Results: Three major findings emerged from the analysis of the focus group transcripts: (1) Participants described their personal goals and how they attempted to achieve a balance between these personal goals and their goals for the care of their dependent elderly family members. The personal goals were principally in two domains: the caregivers' relationships &ucirc; both with the elder and with others &ucirc; and the caregivers' own well-being. (2) The caregivers also described the values that were behind their goals: the most consistently invoked values were love, duty and respect. (3) The participants also described the significant stressors that affected them in their roles as caregivers. These included stress related to guilt over the admission to the nursing home; stress rooted in the ongoing deterioration of their loved one; stress related to conflicts in goals and/or values and stress related to multiple time commitments, family conflicts, and interaction with health care providers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:06:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:06:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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