Children's Perceptions of Death and Their Resultant Grief Following the National Tragedy of September 11th, 2001

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151587
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Children's Perceptions of Death and Their Resultant Grief Following the National Tragedy of September 11th, 2001
Abstract:
Children's Perceptions of Death and Their Resultant Grief Following the National Tragedy of September 11th, 2001
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Harvey, Margaret, PhD, RN, MSN, MAT
P.I. Institution Name:Calvin College
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
An unanticipated outgrowth of a quasi-experimental study investigating the effect of children's (n=81) audiotaped storybooks on expressive and receptive vocabulary development, children in the control group (ages 3 + -6 years) expressed themselves in a nonliteracy-related activity, through the medium of art. It was during the data collection and standardized post-testing phase of the study that the national tragedy of September 11th occurred. Surprisingly, perceptions of death in reaction to this national disaster were expressed by many children assigned by stratified random sampling to the placebo control group, via their drawings. Their artwork was later examined in relation to the theoretical frameworks of Piaget and John Bowlby . It has been questioned whether children have the cognitive and emotional ability to understand death and experience mourning. Historically, children's bereavement reactions have been debated and questioned. This study's creative outlet allowed children to express their feelings in a non-threatening, imaginative environment. Studying the drawings, children's grief manifestations included shock, loneliness, anxiety, worry, and fantasy regarding the permanence of death. Results reflected egocentricity as youngsters interpreted the tragedy against a backdrop of animism and magical thinking, and in terms of self and their immediate experiences with death. This research highlights how any study can yield unexpected results different than the initial focus. Specifically, it emphasizes childrens' struggle to comprehend the sadness around them and their view of death as being a temporary and reversible phenomenon.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildren's Perceptions of Death and Their Resultant Grief Following the National Tragedy of September 11th, 2001en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151587-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Children's Perceptions of Death and Their Resultant Grief Following the National Tragedy of September 11th, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harvey, Margaret, PhD, RN, MSN, MAT</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Calvin College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">MargaretTHarvey@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">An unanticipated outgrowth of a quasi-experimental study investigating the effect of children's (n=81) audiotaped storybooks on expressive and receptive vocabulary development, children in the control group (ages 3 + -6 years) expressed themselves in a nonliteracy-related activity, through the medium of art. It was during the data collection and standardized post-testing phase of the study that the national tragedy of September 11th occurred. Surprisingly, perceptions of death in reaction to this national disaster were expressed by many children assigned by stratified random sampling to the placebo control group, via their drawings. Their artwork was later examined in relation to the theoretical frameworks of Piaget and John Bowlby . It has been questioned whether children have the cognitive and emotional ability to understand death and experience mourning. Historically, children's bereavement reactions have been debated and questioned. This study's creative outlet allowed children to express their feelings in a non-threatening, imaginative environment. Studying the drawings, children's grief manifestations included shock, loneliness, anxiety, worry, and fantasy regarding the permanence of death. Results reflected egocentricity as youngsters interpreted the tragedy against a backdrop of animism and magical thinking, and in terms of self and their immediate experiences with death. This research highlights how any study can yield unexpected results different than the initial focus. Specifically, it emphasizes childrens' struggle to comprehend the sadness around them and their view of death as being a temporary and reversible phenomenon.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:07:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:07:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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