Identifying How Nurses Support Families of the Critically Ill Prior to Implementing a Clinical Practice Protocol

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151590
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying How Nurses Support Families of the Critically Ill Prior to Implementing a Clinical Practice Protocol
Abstract:
Identifying How Nurses Support Families of the Critically Ill Prior to Implementing a Clinical Practice Protocol
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Berry, Janet M., RN, MN, BappSc
P.I. Institution Name:La Trobe University
Title:Ms
Co-Authors:Ruth Endacott, RN, PhD; Mari Botti, RN, PhD
In a critical care environment, changes occur rapidly with technology, drug therapy and medical interventions. It could be argued, change is an integral part of life as a critical care nurse. The best evidence should be readily available to nurses to help support their clinical decision making and practices, and then there is the challenge of knowing what nurses currently do which is effective, and what could improve effectiveness. Nurses find it difficult to support families of the critically ill, often describing this as more stressful than caring for a complex critically ill patient (Lallemand et al, 2003). Caring for the families is time consuming and taxing, as they have many needs (Leske, 1992; Molter, 1979). Martinez et al (2003) demonstrated involving families in the basic care of patients, significantly improved the patients mini mental state test scores and STAI test scores, and reduced the anxiety levels of the families and nurses involved in the patient's care. A study looking at nurses supporting families of the critically ill prior to implementing a clinical practice protocol was important so nurses could identify what the current practices were among nurses in the critical care unit and what behaviours were seen by family members as supportive. Data collection included: Assessing how nurses perceived their team climate for innovation and development using the Team Climate Inventory (Anderson & West, 1998). Nurses and families identifying critical junctures, and ranking the importance of nurses support at these times. Describing the families' experience of nurses' support at critical junctures using the professional support questionnaire (Waters, 1999). Observing nurses' interactions and communication with families at critical junctures during their stay in a critical care unit. The study provided vital information to inform the future intervention of implementing a clinical practice protocol to improve family communication and support
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying How Nurses Support Families of the Critically Ill Prior to Implementing a Clinical Practice Protocolen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151590-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identifying How Nurses Support Families of the Critically Ill Prior to Implementing a Clinical Practice Protocol</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Berry, Janet M., RN, MN, BappSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">La Trobe University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">j.berry@latrobe.edu.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ruth Endacott, RN, PhD; Mari Botti, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In a critical care environment, changes occur rapidly with technology, drug therapy and medical interventions. It could be argued, change is an integral part of life as a critical care nurse. The best evidence should be readily available to nurses to help support their clinical decision making and practices, and then there is the challenge of knowing what nurses currently do which is effective, and what could improve effectiveness. Nurses find it difficult to support families of the critically ill, often describing this as more stressful than caring for a complex critically ill patient (Lallemand et al, 2003). Caring for the families is time consuming and taxing, as they have many needs (Leske, 1992; Molter, 1979). Martinez et al (2003) demonstrated involving families in the basic care of patients, significantly improved the patients mini mental state test scores and STAI test scores, and reduced the anxiety levels of the families and nurses involved in the patient's care. A study looking at nurses supporting families of the critically ill prior to implementing a clinical practice protocol was important so nurses could identify what the current practices were among nurses in the critical care unit and what behaviours were seen by family members as supportive. Data collection included: Assessing how nurses perceived their team climate for innovation and development using the Team Climate Inventory (Anderson &amp; West, 1998). Nurses and families identifying critical junctures, and ranking the importance of nurses support at these times. Describing the families' experience of nurses' support at critical junctures using the professional support questionnaire (Waters, 1999). Observing nurses' interactions and communication with families at critical junctures during their stay in a critical care unit. The study provided vital information to inform the future intervention of implementing a clinical practice protocol to improve family communication and support</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:07:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:07:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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