Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation Training to Reduce Blood Pressure: Do Effects Generalize outside the Clinic?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151613
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation Training to Reduce Blood Pressure: Do Effects Generalize outside the Clinic?
Abstract:
Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation Training to Reduce Blood Pressure: Do Effects Generalize outside the Clinic?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Yucha, Carolyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Florida
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Pei-Shan Tsai, Kristine S. Calderon, Lili Tian
Funded by NIH-NCCAM (PI: Carolyn Yucha, R01 AT00310)<P> Purpose: Approximately 50% of hypertensives can learn to lower their blood pressure (BP), as measured in the clinic, using biofeedback training. Such reports do not demonstrate whether the treatment effects generalize outside the clinic. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between those who lowered their clinic BP and those who lowered their ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) after biofeedback-assisted relaxation training. <P> Methods: Fifty-four adults (17 male and 37 female; 36 white, 15 black, and 3 other races) with hypertension were studied. Biofeedback-assisted relaxation training was provided using thermal, electromyography (EMG), and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) biofeedback using Procomp+ / Multitrace biofeedback system (STENS Corp, Oakland, CA), coupled with deep breathing, autogenics, and progressive muscle relaxation. ABP was measured over 24 hours using an ambulatory BP monitor (Spacelabs Medical, Inc, Redmond, WA). Clinic BP was measured using the same instrument in the manual mode. Improvement was defined as being able to decrease BP 5 mm Hg or more.<P> Results: For the entire sample (n=54), 50%, 44%, and 39% reduced their clinic SBP, DBP and MAP, respectively; 33%, 29% and 27% reduced their daytime ambulatory SBP, DBP and MAP respectively. For unmedicated subjects (n=12), 67%, 50%, and 42% reduced their clinic SBP, DBP and MAP, respectively; 50%, 33% and 33% reduced their daytime ambulatory SBP, DBP and MAP, respectively. Forty-four percent of those who lowered their clinic SBP, also lowered their ambulatory SBP; 45% of those who lowered their clinic DBP, also lowered their ambulatory DBP; 42% of those who lowered their clinic MAP, also lowered their ambulatory MAP. <P> Discussion: Approximately 50% of hypertensives lowered their clinic BP using biofeedback-assisted relaxation training. This BP lowering effect generalized to an ambulatory setting for less than half of the participants. <P> <!--Abstract 13292 modified by 159.178.41.92 on 11-1-2002--></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBiofeedback-Assisted Relaxation Training to Reduce Blood Pressure: Do Effects Generalize outside the Clinic?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151613-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation Training to Reduce Blood Pressure: Do Effects Generalize outside the Clinic?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yucha, Carolyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yuchacb@nursing.ufl.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pei-Shan Tsai, Kristine S. Calderon, Lili Tian</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Funded by NIH-NCCAM (PI: Carolyn Yucha, R01 AT00310)&lt;P&gt; Purpose: Approximately 50% of hypertensives can learn to lower their blood pressure (BP), as measured in the clinic, using biofeedback training. Such reports do not demonstrate whether the treatment effects generalize outside the clinic. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between those who lowered their clinic BP and those who lowered their ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) after biofeedback-assisted relaxation training. &lt;P&gt; Methods: Fifty-four adults (17 male and 37 female; 36 white, 15 black, and 3 other races) with hypertension were studied. Biofeedback-assisted relaxation training was provided using thermal, electromyography (EMG), and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) biofeedback using Procomp+ / Multitrace biofeedback system (STENS Corp, Oakland, CA), coupled with deep breathing, autogenics, and progressive muscle relaxation. ABP was measured over 24 hours using an ambulatory BP monitor (Spacelabs Medical, Inc, Redmond, WA). Clinic BP was measured using the same instrument in the manual mode. Improvement was defined as being able to decrease BP 5 mm Hg or more.&lt;P&gt; Results: For the entire sample (n=54), 50%, 44%, and 39% reduced their clinic SBP, DBP and MAP, respectively; 33%, 29% and 27% reduced their daytime ambulatory SBP, DBP and MAP respectively. For unmedicated subjects (n=12), 67%, 50%, and 42% reduced their clinic SBP, DBP and MAP, respectively; 50%, 33% and 33% reduced their daytime ambulatory SBP, DBP and MAP, respectively. Forty-four percent of those who lowered their clinic SBP, also lowered their ambulatory SBP; 45% of those who lowered their clinic DBP, also lowered their ambulatory DBP; 42% of those who lowered their clinic MAP, also lowered their ambulatory MAP. &lt;P&gt; Discussion: Approximately 50% of hypertensives lowered their clinic BP using biofeedback-assisted relaxation training. This BP lowering effect generalized to an ambulatory setting for less than half of the participants. &lt;P&gt; &lt;!--Abstract 13292 modified by 159.178.41.92 on 11-1-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:07:58Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:07:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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