A Structural Equation Model of the Effect of Expectant Women's Appraisal of their Pregnancy Risk on Maternal-Fetal Attachment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151618
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Structural Equation Model of the Effect of Expectant Women's Appraisal of their Pregnancy Risk on Maternal-Fetal Attachment
Abstract:
A Structural Equation Model of the Effect of Expectant Women's Appraisal of their Pregnancy Risk on Maternal-Fetal Attachment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Gray, Bobbe
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To test a structural equation model of the effect of expectant women's appraisal of pregnancy risk on maternal-fetal attachment.<P> Design: Nonexperimental, survey design.<P> Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 174 expectant women diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes, or preterm labor were recruited from three high-risk maternity units in a large midwestern hospital during 1999-2001.<P> Concepts Studied Together: Uncertainty in illness and perceived control over health were proposed to be antecedents to women's appraisal of pregnancy risk. Pregnancy risk appraisal was proposed to affect emotions, coping behaviors, and maternal-fetal attachment.<P> Methods: Following human subjects guidelines, women were asked to complete the survey packet while waiting for their appointment or during their hospital stay. The packet consisted of Mishel's (1990) Uncertainty in Illness Scale; Wallston, Stein, and Smith's (1994) Multidimensional Health Locus of Control–Form C; Smith, Wallston, and Smith's (1995) Perceived Health Competency Scale; Gray's (2001) Pregnancy Risk Appraisal Form; Stewart, Ware, Sherbourne, and Wells (1991) Medical Outcomes Study Psychological Distress/Well-Being Battery; Vitaliano, Russo, Carr, Maiuro, and Becker's (1985) Revised Ways of Coping Checklist; Cranley's (1981) Maternal-Fetal Attachment Scale.<P> Findings: AMOS 4 analysis revealed the fit of the proposed model was poor, chi square (54, N=174)=2476.41, p&lt;.001. The respecified model had an acceptable fit, chi square (58, N=174)=59.32, p=.43 with a significant positive direct effect of uncertainty on emotions, a direct negative effect of efficacy on both emotions and risk appraisal. <P> Conclusions: Both uncertainty and self-efficacy affect risk appraisal. Emotions were impacted more by uncertainty than the appraised risk. Pregnancy risk had no significant impact on maternal-fetal attachment.<P> Implications: Efforts to keep women informed to decrease uncertainty and support their self-efficacy may impact emotional response to high-risk pregnancy. Concerns regarding maternal-fetal attachment should be based on issues other than pregnancy risk status.<!--Abstract 13514 modified by 130.108.175.149 on 11-4-2002--></P></P></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Structural Equation Model of the Effect of Expectant Women's Appraisal of their Pregnancy Risk on Maternal-Fetal Attachmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151618-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Structural Equation Model of the Effect of Expectant Women's Appraisal of their Pregnancy Risk on Maternal-Fetal Attachment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gray, Bobbe</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bobbe.gray@wright.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To test a structural equation model of the effect of expectant women's appraisal of pregnancy risk on maternal-fetal attachment.&lt;P&gt; Design: Nonexperimental, survey design.&lt;P&gt; Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 174 expectant women diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes, or preterm labor were recruited from three high-risk maternity units in a large midwestern hospital during 1999-2001.&lt;P&gt; Concepts Studied Together: Uncertainty in illness and perceived control over health were proposed to be antecedents to women's appraisal of pregnancy risk. Pregnancy risk appraisal was proposed to affect emotions, coping behaviors, and maternal-fetal attachment.&lt;P&gt; Methods: Following human subjects guidelines, women were asked to complete the survey packet while waiting for their appointment or during their hospital stay. The packet consisted of Mishel's (1990) Uncertainty in Illness Scale; Wallston, Stein, and Smith's (1994) Multidimensional Health Locus of Control&ndash;Form C; Smith, Wallston, and Smith's (1995) Perceived Health Competency Scale; Gray's (2001) Pregnancy Risk Appraisal Form; Stewart, Ware, Sherbourne, and Wells (1991) Medical Outcomes Study Psychological Distress/Well-Being Battery; Vitaliano, Russo, Carr, Maiuro, and Becker's (1985) Revised Ways of Coping Checklist; Cranley's (1981) Maternal-Fetal Attachment Scale.&lt;P&gt; Findings: AMOS 4 analysis revealed the fit of the proposed model was poor, chi square (54, N=174)=2476.41, p&amp;lt;.001. The respecified model had an acceptable fit, chi square (58, N=174)=59.32, p=.43 with a significant positive direct effect of uncertainty on emotions, a direct negative effect of efficacy on both emotions and risk appraisal. &lt;P&gt; Conclusions: Both uncertainty and self-efficacy affect risk appraisal. Emotions were impacted more by uncertainty than the appraised risk. Pregnancy risk had no significant impact on maternal-fetal attachment.&lt;P&gt; Implications: Efforts to keep women informed to decrease uncertainty and support their self-efficacy may impact emotional response to high-risk pregnancy. Concerns regarding maternal-fetal attachment should be based on issues other than pregnancy risk status.&lt;!--Abstract 13514 modified by 130.108.175.149 on 11-4-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:08:07Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:08:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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