2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151621
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Access to STD Services in Duval County, Florida
Abstract:
Access to STD Services in Duval County, Florida
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Hood, Kay, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Florida
Title:Women's Health Nurse Practitioner
Objective: To determine the problems community members have with access to STD services in Duval County, Florida. Design: Ethnography was used. Population: The sample was taken from members of the community.<P> Concepts: Kleinman’s explanatory model was used to conceptualize health beliefs and health seeking behaviors. Method: An ethnographic study was done using chain sampling to conduct interviews with members of the community individually and in focus groups. Where possible interviews were recorded and transcribed. Field notes, historical data, statistical information and local documents were used in the data analysis. Findings: Absence of symptoms, being unsure of where, when and how to access health care services, lack of transportation, extended hours and issues surrounding confidentiality are all barriers. The lack of education about STD’s and public health services which are compartmentalized and not uniformly distributed are significant factors. Most informants felt that adolescents and young adult males were least likely to obtain services.Conclusions: The Department of Health could improve access by marketing services and increasing accessibility of sites. There has been increased media attention to HIV/AIDS education, there needs to be more education (multimedia) about the symptoms of STD’s and the need for routine testing if participating in high-risk behaviors since these infections may be precursors to HIV/AIDS. Non-judgmental education regarding sex, sexuality, refusal skills and protective skills need to be delivered accurately to those who need it the most. The schools are optimal delivery sites, however this is problematic when the health programs are based on abstinence as the best route of protection. Implications: STD’s will continue to be a silent plague with only the “tip of the iceberg” being tested and treated until more comprehensive sex education is provided in a non-judgmental manner, and the delivery system is changed to facilitate access across economic, age, and gender lines.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccess to STD Services in Duval County, Floridaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151621-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Access to STD Services in Duval County, Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hood, Kay, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Women's Health Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">khood1955@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To determine the problems community members have with access to STD services in Duval County, Florida. Design: Ethnography was used. Population: The sample was taken from members of the community.&lt;P&gt; Concepts: Kleinman&rsquo;s explanatory model was used to conceptualize health beliefs and health seeking behaviors. Method: An ethnographic study was done using chain sampling to conduct interviews with members of the community individually and in focus groups. Where possible interviews were recorded and transcribed. Field notes, historical data, statistical information and local documents were used in the data analysis. Findings: Absence of symptoms, being unsure of where, when and how to access health care services, lack of transportation, extended hours and issues surrounding confidentiality are all barriers. The lack of education about STD&rsquo;s and public health services which are compartmentalized and not uniformly distributed are significant factors. Most informants felt that adolescents and young adult males were least likely to obtain services.Conclusions: The Department of Health could improve access by marketing services and increasing accessibility of sites. There has been increased media attention to HIV/AIDS education, there needs to be more education (multimedia) about the symptoms of STD&rsquo;s and the need for routine testing if participating in high-risk behaviors since these infections may be precursors to HIV/AIDS. Non-judgmental education regarding sex, sexuality, refusal skills and protective skills need to be delivered accurately to those who need it the most. The schools are optimal delivery sites, however this is problematic when the health programs are based on abstinence as the best route of protection. Implications: STD&rsquo;s will continue to be a silent plague with only the &ldquo;tip of the iceberg&rdquo; being tested and treated until more comprehensive sex education is provided in a non-judgmental manner, and the delivery system is changed to facilitate access across economic, age, and gender lines.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:08:13Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:08:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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