2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151625
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diversity of Working Condition Stressors Among Nursing Specialties
Abstract:
Diversity of Working Condition Stressors Among Nursing Specialties
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Rea, Ruth, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Health Care Studies/Clinical Investigation Activity
Title:Nurse Researcher
Objective: Identify nursing work-condition stress factors suggesting effective organizational interventions, and assess differences among four specialties in factors and in relationships of work-related stress and retention.<P> Design: Descriptive study using 79-item questionnaire including Aiken's 51-item Nursing Work Conditions Index-Revised (NWIR) to collect information about overall stress, work-condition stressors, intention-to-stay, and demographics.<P> Population, Sample, Setting, Years: All nurses employed full-time in Emergency Department (ED), Critical Care (CC), Medical-Surgical (MS) and Postpartum (PP) in two N.W. U.S. hospitals in 2002. Of 450 nurses, 50% (n=225) returned completed surveys.<P> Concepts or Variables Studied Together: Overall work-related stress in diverse nursing specialties related to organizational outcome of retention, and differences among specialties for specific work-condition stress factors.<P> Methods: 79-item questionnaires placed in work mailboxes of subjects, collected eight days later. Differences in stressors and retention measures assessed by ANOVA, with specific work-condition factors identified using factor analysis.<P> Findings: Specialties reported similar levels of moderate or higher overall stress (ED=44.4%; CC=43.5%; MS=48.5%; PP=26.3%, p=.09). Significant differences exist for intent to leave unit (p=.006) or nursing (p=.007) within one year, with MS nurses most likely to leave unit (20.4%) and ED nurses 2-3 times more likely to leave nursing (22.3%). Factor analysis of NWIR using oblique rotation yielded eight work-condition-stress factors (e.g., culture, leadership relationships, support) accounting for 57% of variance. Significant differences across specialties exist for 6 of 8 factors with ED nurses consistently lower for work-condition stress than MS and PP. <P> Conclusions: Higher overall stress is associated with negative outcomes of leaving unit or leaving nursing for all specialties. Specific work-condition factors identified suggest broad categories of interventions addressing work stress. <P> Implications: With the long-term nursing shortage, retention is an organizational issue affecting both practice conditions and patient care. Work-condition-stressor differences suggest that effective interventions must be nursing-specialty specific.<!--Abstract 13688 modified by 131.191.49.138 on 11-5-2002--></P></P></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiversity of Working Condition Stressors Among Nursing Specialtiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151625-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diversity of Working Condition Stressors Among Nursing Specialties</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rea, Ruth, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Health Care Studies/Clinical Investigation Activity</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Identify nursing work-condition stress factors suggesting effective organizational interventions, and assess differences among four specialties in factors and in relationships of work-related stress and retention.&lt;P&gt; Design: Descriptive study using 79-item questionnaire including Aiken's 51-item Nursing Work Conditions Index-Revised (NWIR) to collect information about overall stress, work-condition stressors, intention-to-stay, and demographics.&lt;P&gt; Population, Sample, Setting, Years: All nurses employed full-time in Emergency Department (ED), Critical Care (CC), Medical-Surgical (MS) and Postpartum (PP) in two N.W. U.S. hospitals in 2002. Of 450 nurses, 50% (n=225) returned completed surveys.&lt;P&gt; Concepts or Variables Studied Together: Overall work-related stress in diverse nursing specialties related to organizational outcome of retention, and differences among specialties for specific work-condition stress factors.&lt;P&gt; Methods: 79-item questionnaires placed in work mailboxes of subjects, collected eight days later. Differences in stressors and retention measures assessed by ANOVA, with specific work-condition factors identified using factor analysis.&lt;P&gt; Findings: Specialties reported similar levels of moderate or higher overall stress (ED=44.4%; CC=43.5%; MS=48.5%; PP=26.3%, p=.09). Significant differences exist for intent to leave unit (p=.006) or nursing (p=.007) within one year, with MS nurses most likely to leave unit (20.4%) and ED nurses 2-3 times more likely to leave nursing (22.3%). Factor analysis of NWIR using oblique rotation yielded eight work-condition-stress factors (e.g., culture, leadership relationships, support) accounting for 57% of variance. Significant differences across specialties exist for 6 of 8 factors with ED nurses consistently lower for work-condition stress than MS and PP. &lt;P&gt; Conclusions: Higher overall stress is associated with negative outcomes of leaving unit or leaving nursing for all specialties. Specific work-condition factors identified suggest broad categories of interventions addressing work stress. &lt;P&gt; Implications: With the long-term nursing shortage, retention is an organizational issue affecting both practice conditions and patient care. Work-condition-stressor differences suggest that effective interventions must be nursing-specialty specific.&lt;!--Abstract 13688 modified by 131.191.49.138 on 11-5-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:08:21Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:08:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.