Transatlantic Nursing Education: Developing Intercultural Competence in a Multicultural Workforce

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151633
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transatlantic Nursing Education: Developing Intercultural Competence in a Multicultural Workforce
Abstract:
Transatlantic Nursing Education: Developing Intercultural Competence in a Multicultural Workforce
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Blackburn, Donna S., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Western Kentucky University
Title:Professor and Department Head
Co-Authors:Mary Jo Gilmer, PhD, RN; Linda Norman, DSN, MSN, RN; Joan Mcgill, DSN, RN; Iain Graham, RN, RMN, PhD, MEd, MSc, BSc; Eva Bergknut, MSN, RN; Liisa Koskinen, PhD, RN
Paper presentation ABSTRACT "Introduction:" As a result of a global nursing shortage and international recruitment of nurses, workforces are becoming more ethnically diverse. Subsequently, challenges arise when healthcare teams are comprised of professionals who have been educated in different countries with different healthcare practices, educational systems and role expectations. The major focus within nursing has been the interaction between the nurse and client from different cultural backgrounds. Much less emphasis has been placed on the nurse-nurse relationship when cultural differences exist. "Objective:" The purpose of this study is to assess nursing students' intercultural competence when working with nurse partners from different cultural backgrounds. "Design:" This qualitative study used a comparative descriptive design. "Population, sample, setting, years:" Twenty-four (24) nursing students participated in a transatlantic exchange among six (6) Universities. Specifically, students participated in one of three U.S.-European exchanges, which ranged in length from 4 to 12 weeks. "Outcome variable:" Intercultural competence. "Conceptual framework:" An intercultural sensitivity model developed by Bennett (1993) based on a continuum from ethnocentrism to ethnorelativism served as the conceptual framework for this study. "Methods:" Data were collected as part of the educational requirements for student exchanges and included 3 sources of data: reflective journals, critical incidence analysis narratives and responses to questions given to students during a de-briefing session at the end of the exchange. Content analysis was used to summarize and compare the data. "Findings:" Analysis of the data revealed a transition from ethnocentric to ethnorelative stages by the end of the exchange visits. Students initially expressed feelings indicative of denial, defense and minimization. However, by the end of the exchange, reflective journals and narratives reflected acceptance, adaptation and integration into another culture. "Conclusions:" The results of this study demonstrate the value of an international nursing student exchange as a strategy to promote intercultural competence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransatlantic Nursing Education: Developing Intercultural Competence in a Multicultural Workforceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151633-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Transatlantic Nursing Education: Developing Intercultural Competence in a Multicultural Workforce</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blackburn, Donna S., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Western Kentucky University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Department Head</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">donna.blackburn@wku.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Jo Gilmer, PhD, RN; Linda Norman, DSN, MSN, RN; Joan Mcgill, DSN, RN; Iain Graham, RN, RMN, PhD, MEd, MSc, BSc; Eva Bergknut, MSN, RN; Liisa Koskinen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Paper presentation ABSTRACT &quot;Introduction:&quot; As a result of a global nursing shortage and international recruitment of nurses, workforces are becoming more ethnically diverse. Subsequently, challenges arise when healthcare teams are comprised of professionals who have been educated in different countries with different healthcare practices, educational systems and role expectations. The major focus within nursing has been the interaction between the nurse and client from different cultural backgrounds. Much less emphasis has been placed on the nurse-nurse relationship when cultural differences exist. &quot;Objective:&quot; The purpose of this study is to assess nursing students' intercultural competence when working with nurse partners from different cultural backgrounds. &quot;Design:&quot; This qualitative study used a comparative descriptive design. &quot;Population, sample, setting, years:&quot; Twenty-four (24) nursing students participated in a transatlantic exchange among six (6) Universities. Specifically, students participated in one of three U.S.-European exchanges, which ranged in length from 4 to 12 weeks. &quot;Outcome variable:&quot; Intercultural competence. &quot;Conceptual framework:&quot; An intercultural sensitivity model developed by Bennett (1993) based on a continuum from ethnocentrism to ethnorelativism served as the conceptual framework for this study. &quot;Methods:&quot; Data were collected as part of the educational requirements for student exchanges and included 3 sources of data: reflective journals, critical incidence analysis narratives and responses to questions given to students during a de-briefing session at the end of the exchange. Content analysis was used to summarize and compare the data. &quot;Findings:&quot; Analysis of the data revealed a transition from ethnocentric to ethnorelative stages by the end of the exchange visits. Students initially expressed feelings indicative of denial, defense and minimization. However, by the end of the exchange, reflective journals and narratives reflected acceptance, adaptation and integration into another culture. &quot;Conclusions:&quot; The results of this study demonstrate the value of an international nursing student exchange as a strategy to promote intercultural competence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:08:35Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:08:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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