2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151634
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Peer Tutoring: Creating a Learning Community
Abstract:
Peer Tutoring: Creating a Learning Community
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Blowers, Sally S., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:East Tennessee State University
Title:Associate Professor
Purpose/Objective: To understand the learning community that developed during the implementation of a peer tutoring program. Design: Descriptive Qualitative Case Study. Participants: Thirty-three peer tutors who provided tutoring for less advanced nursing students. Subjects tutored included nursing and required pre-nursing theory courses. Methods: Qualitative data included surveys completed by participants during their final semester in the nursing program, focus group interviews, and audio tapes of group tutoring sessions. Data were analyzed initially for the scope of tutoring experiences and then for themes related to peer tutors' contributions to the academic success of their tutorees (The word tutoree was chosen at the outset of the program to indicate the one receiving tutoring, rather than the word "tutee.") Findings: Tutors' contributions centered on five major themes: Interpreting the teacher, Building confidence, Explaining the process, Recognizing the important, and Easing the burden. The themes encompass emotional and cognitive concerns of tutorees as well as intellectual understanding. Conclusions: Even though peer tutors and faculty both deal with subject matter, there are significant differences in the scope of their activities. Peer tutors acknowledge learners' needs more holistically and act directly to promote a learning community. Faculty may be aware of learners' emotional and cognitive concerns, but are often able to intervene only tangentially and to promote learning community indirectly. Implications: The intensity and scope of nursing courses create significant distress for today's nursing student. A learning community eases the stresses and promotes academic success. Learning communities are the products of deliberate, affirmative student interactions such as those that occur among peer tutors and their tutorees.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePeer Tutoring: Creating a Learning Communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151634-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Peer Tutoring: Creating a Learning Community</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blowers, Sally S., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">East Tennessee State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">blowers@etsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Objective: To understand the learning community that developed during the implementation of a peer tutoring program. Design: Descriptive Qualitative Case Study. Participants: Thirty-three peer tutors who provided tutoring for less advanced nursing students. Subjects tutored included nursing and required pre-nursing theory courses. Methods: Qualitative data included surveys completed by participants during their final semester in the nursing program, focus group interviews, and audio tapes of group tutoring sessions. Data were analyzed initially for the scope of tutoring experiences and then for themes related to peer tutors' contributions to the academic success of their tutorees (The word tutoree was chosen at the outset of the program to indicate the one receiving tutoring, rather than the word &quot;tutee.&quot;) Findings: Tutors' contributions centered on five major themes: Interpreting the teacher, Building confidence, Explaining the process, Recognizing the important, and Easing the burden. The themes encompass emotional and cognitive concerns of tutorees as well as intellectual understanding. Conclusions: Even though peer tutors and faculty both deal with subject matter, there are significant differences in the scope of their activities. Peer tutors acknowledge learners' needs more holistically and act directly to promote a learning community. Faculty may be aware of learners' emotional and cognitive concerns, but are often able to intervene only tangentially and to promote learning community indirectly. Implications: The intensity and scope of nursing courses create significant distress for today's nursing student. A learning community eases the stresses and promotes academic success. Learning communities are the products of deliberate, affirmative student interactions such as those that occur among peer tutors and their tutorees.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:08:36Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:08:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.