2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151636
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Explanatory Theory of Social Capital
Abstract:
An Explanatory Theory of Social Capital
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Carlson, Elizabeth, DSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Co-Authors:Joan Engebretson, RN, DrPH; Robert M. Chamberlain, PhD
Objective: Social capital, a relatively new public health concept, represents the intangible resources embedded in social relationships that facilitate collective action. However, in order for social capital to function as a meaningful research variable, conceptual development aimed at refining the domains, attributes, and boundaries of the concept are needed. The purpose of this program of research was to develop a more mature grounding of the concept for public health intervention and research. Concept: An existing framework of social capital (Uphoff, 2000) was selected for congruence with the inductive analysis of pilot data from an African American community that was unsuccessful at mobilizing collective action. Design: A formal ethnographic research study was designed to examine the components of social capital in a community that had successfully mobilized collective action. The specific aim of the study was to examine the fittingness of Uphoff’s framework of social capital in an American community. Population: A contrasting context was purposefully selected to distinguish essential attributes of social capital. The setting was a small, rural, predominantly White community in the southern United States. Sampling selected various organizational entities within the community for study. Formal fieldwork was conducted during a two-week period in June 2003. Methods: Ethnographic data collection methods included participant observation, formal interviews, and public documents. Findings: Although Uphoff’s framework was useful, refinement of the framework resulted in the emergence of an explanatory theory of social capital that was supported by research findings. Conclusions: Social capital is the combination of the cultural norms of the community and the group that are either constructive or destructive to the development of trust and the efficacy of mutually beneficial collective action Implications: The explanatory theory of social capital that evolved holds pragmatic utility for public health research and practice that seeks to address health disparities through participatory methods.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Explanatory Theory of Social Capitalen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151636-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Explanatory Theory of Social Capital</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carlson, Elizabeth, DSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">betsycarlson@kingwoodcable.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joan Engebretson, RN, DrPH; Robert M. Chamberlain, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Social capital, a relatively new public health concept, represents the intangible resources embedded in social relationships that facilitate collective action. However, in order for social capital to function as a meaningful research variable, conceptual development aimed at refining the domains, attributes, and boundaries of the concept are needed. The purpose of this program of research was to develop a more mature grounding of the concept for public health intervention and research. Concept: An existing framework of social capital (Uphoff, 2000) was selected for congruence with the inductive analysis of pilot data from an African American community that was unsuccessful at mobilizing collective action. Design: A formal ethnographic research study was designed to examine the components of social capital in a community that had successfully mobilized collective action. The specific aim of the study was to examine the fittingness of Uphoff&rsquo;s framework of social capital in an American community. Population: A contrasting context was purposefully selected to distinguish essential attributes of social capital. The setting was a small, rural, predominantly White community in the southern United States. Sampling selected various organizational entities within the community for study. Formal fieldwork was conducted during a two-week period in June 2003. Methods: Ethnographic data collection methods included participant observation, formal interviews, and public documents. Findings: Although Uphoff&rsquo;s framework was useful, refinement of the framework resulted in the emergence of an explanatory theory of social capital that was supported by research findings. Conclusions: Social capital is the combination of the cultural norms of the community and the group that are either constructive or destructive to the development of trust and the efficacy of mutually beneficial collective action Implications: The explanatory theory of social capital that evolved holds pragmatic utility for public health research and practice that seeks to address health disparities through participatory methods.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:08:41Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:08:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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