Using Existing Data as an Evidence Source for Practice: Possibilities and Problems

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151640
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Existing Data as an Evidence Source for Practice: Possibilities and Problems
Abstract:
Using Existing Data as an Evidence Source for Practice: Possibilities and Problems
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Cobe, Gail, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center/San Francisco Department of Public Health
Title:Director of Education and Training
Co-Authors:Carol Maher, RN, RAC-C; Anne M. Hughes, RN, MN, FAAN
Existing data are sources of evidence often suggested for nurses to use to improve their practice. Data reports may include infection control surveillance, unusual occurrences (or incident reports), drug utilization, product evaluation and mandatory clinical data collected in specific clinical areas. Since 1987 all skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) in the United States, have been required to use a standardized framework for assessing and planning care for each resident whose payment is Medicare and Medicaid. Known as the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI), this framework contains a comprehensive screening tool, the Minimum Data Set (MDS) which collects patient specific information such as level of cognitive skills, functional status, continence, mood and behavior, nutrition, medications, rehabilitation potential, pain, and skin condition. Although constructed to be interdisciplinary, most of data collection and the process is driven by nurses. Since first introduced the data has become the foundation not only for the identification of potential problems for specific SNF residents, but has become the foundation for reimbursement, for licensing and certification surveys, quality improvement, and for benchmarking with other facilities. While important to the financial well being of the institution, its standing in the community, and to document outcomes of nursing care, there are myriad problems in the instrument and its use. This presentation focuses on the problems of the MDS as a source of data for nursing practice and on its promise.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Existing Data as an Evidence Source for Practice: Possibilities and Problemsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151640-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Existing Data as an Evidence Source for Practice: Possibilities and Problems</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cobe, Gail, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center/San Francisco Department of Public Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Education and Training</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Gail.Cobe@sfdph.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol Maher, RN, RAC-C; Anne M. Hughes, RN, MN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Existing data are sources of evidence often suggested for nurses to use to improve their practice. Data reports may include infection control surveillance, unusual occurrences (or incident reports), drug utilization, product evaluation and mandatory clinical data collected in specific clinical areas. Since 1987 all skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) in the United States, have been required to use a standardized framework for assessing and planning care for each resident whose payment is Medicare and Medicaid. Known as the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI), this framework contains a comprehensive screening tool, the Minimum Data Set (MDS) which collects patient specific information such as level of cognitive skills, functional status, continence, mood and behavior, nutrition, medications, rehabilitation potential, pain, and skin condition. Although constructed to be interdisciplinary, most of data collection and the process is driven by nurses. Since first introduced the data has become the foundation not only for the identification of potential problems for specific SNF residents, but has become the foundation for reimbursement, for licensing and certification surveys, quality improvement, and for benchmarking with other facilities. While important to the financial well being of the institution, its standing in the community, and to document outcomes of nursing care, there are myriad problems in the instrument and its use. This presentation focuses on the problems of the MDS as a source of data for nursing practice and on its promise.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:08:50Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:08:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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