Knowledge Migration, Culture, and Science: A Case Study of Children, Nurses, and Tuberculosis Prevention in Western Europe and North America, 1900-1940

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151641
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge Migration, Culture, and Science: A Case Study of Children, Nurses, and Tuberculosis Prevention in Western Europe and North America, 1900-1940
Abstract:
Knowledge Migration, Culture, and Science: A Case Study of Children, Nurses, and Tuberculosis Prevention in Western Europe and North America, 1900-1940
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Connolly, Cynthia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Yale University
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Knowledge Migration, Culture, and Science: A Case Study of Children, Nurses, and Tuberculosis Prevention in Western Europe and North America, 1900-1940 Objective: Tuberculosis was a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in early twentieth century North America and Western Europe. The 1903 finding that many asymptomatic children harbored the tubercule bacillus galvanized the nursing and medical communities and reshaped the focus of the international crusade to eliminate tuberculosis from treatment to prevention. This paper analyzes early twentieth century transnational similarities and differences in nurses’ pediatric TB prevention efforts and the nationalism embedded in their scientific underpinnings. Design and Methods: Social history methodology was used to explicate nurses’ efforts with regard to pediatric TB prevention in the United States and Western Europe between 1900 and 1940. Primary sources included archival materials from the National Library of Medicine, the New York City Public Library the New York Academy of Medicine, and early twentieth century newspapers, journal articles, and books. Findings: Nurses were at the center of antituberculosis campaigns. Drawing upon the efforts of other nations, nurses and public health reformers modified them to design interventions consistent with their country’s unique cultural norms and values. Conclusions: Infectious disease prevention and management is an enduring issues nurses face no matter where in the world they practice. The early twentieth century was a frustrating time in the campaign against TB. The disease's etiology and transmission were understood but there were few effective treatments. As a result, prevention was the centerpiece of most TB public health campaigns in North America and Western Europe. Implications: Examining the history of tuberculosis nursing care provides a unique vantage point to study the cultural dimensions of risk and prevention embedded in nursing care and the interplay between science, culture, nurses, and government in the evolution of the modern welfare state.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge Migration, Culture, and Science: A Case Study of Children, Nurses, and Tuberculosis Prevention in Western Europe and North America, 1900-1940en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151641-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Knowledge Migration, Culture, and Science: A Case Study of Children, Nurses, and Tuberculosis Prevention in Western Europe and North America, 1900-1940</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connolly, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yale University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cindy.connolly@yale.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Knowledge Migration, Culture, and Science: A Case Study of Children, Nurses, and Tuberculosis Prevention in Western Europe and North America, 1900-1940 Objective: Tuberculosis was a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in early twentieth century North America and Western Europe. The 1903 finding that many asymptomatic children harbored the tubercule bacillus galvanized the nursing and medical communities and reshaped the focus of the international crusade to eliminate tuberculosis from treatment to prevention. This paper analyzes early twentieth century transnational similarities and differences in nurses&rsquo; pediatric TB prevention efforts and the nationalism embedded in their scientific underpinnings. Design and Methods: Social history methodology was used to explicate nurses&rsquo; efforts with regard to pediatric TB prevention in the United States and Western Europe between 1900 and 1940. Primary sources included archival materials from the National Library of Medicine, the New York City Public Library the New York Academy of Medicine, and early twentieth century newspapers, journal articles, and books. Findings: Nurses were at the center of antituberculosis campaigns. Drawing upon the efforts of other nations, nurses and public health reformers modified them to design interventions consistent with their country&rsquo;s unique cultural norms and values. Conclusions: Infectious disease prevention and management is an enduring issues nurses face no matter where in the world they practice. The early twentieth century was a frustrating time in the campaign against TB. The disease's etiology and transmission were understood but there were few effective treatments. As a result, prevention was the centerpiece of most TB public health campaigns in North America and Western Europe. Implications: Examining the history of tuberculosis nursing care provides a unique vantage point to study the cultural dimensions of risk and prevention embedded in nursing care and the interplay between science, culture, nurses, and government in the evolution of the modern welfare state.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:08:52Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:08:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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