Predicting Research Utilization Among Registered Nurses in Alberta Hospitals Using Multilevel Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151648
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predicting Research Utilization Among Registered Nurses in Alberta Hospitals Using Multilevel Analysis
Abstract:
Predicting Research Utilization Among Registered Nurses in Alberta Hospitals Using Multilevel Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Estabrooks, Carole A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:William Kai Midodzi, BSc, MSc, MSc; Rejean Landry, PhD; Karen Golden-Biddle, PhD; Harley Dickinson, PhD
Objective: To identify factors that predict research utilization independently among nurse clinicians and taking into account different levels of nurse decision-making, at individual, unit and hospital levels. Design: Data from a 1998 International Hospital Outcomes Survey conducted among Alberta registered nurses was used. Though rich in organizational variables, it lacked research utilization measures. To address this, we derived the dependent variable from a 1996 dataset of 600 Alberta staff nurses, and mapped this onto the 1998 dataset. This mapping was done using a regression model with statistically significant matching predictors between datasets. Method: A hierarchical model, with nurses nested within nursing units within hospitals was used to partition and explained the variance in research utilization at three levels of individual nurses, nursing units, and hospitals. We used the model to investigate cross-level interrelationships, and quantify the amount of the variance in research utilization explained at the individual and organizational levels. We further obtained robust estimate of parameter estimate using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation (MCMC). Findings: Research utilization (RU) varies significantly at all three levels: individual nurse level [variance= 0.94 (91.85% of the total variance in RU), p<0.001]; nursing unit level [0.037 (3.62%), p=0.0005]; and at the hospital level [0.047(4.53), p=0.0063]. Significant factors found to predict research utilization among nurse were: nurse education, control over practice, freedom to make decisions, emotional exhaustion, and good nursing leadership on unit. Conclusions: Variation in research utilization was mainly attributed to differences in individual characteristics of nurses, with organizational factors contributing less. Of the latter, however, having good leadership on the unit was the most significant determinant of research utilization Implications: Although organizational determinants explain less of the variance in our model, they are still statistically significant when analyzed alone, and may constitute the threshold needed before individual determinants can exert their considerable influence
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredicting Research Utilization Among Registered Nurses in Alberta Hospitals Using Multilevel Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151648-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predicting Research Utilization Among Registered Nurses in Alberta Hospitals Using Multilevel Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Estabrooks, Carole A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carole.estabrooks@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">William Kai Midodzi, BSc, MSc, MSc; Rejean Landry, PhD; Karen Golden-Biddle, PhD; Harley Dickinson, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To identify factors that predict research utilization independently among nurse clinicians and taking into account different levels of nurse decision-making, at individual, unit and hospital levels. Design: Data from a 1998 International Hospital Outcomes Survey conducted among Alberta registered nurses was used. Though rich in organizational variables, it lacked research utilization measures. To address this, we derived the dependent variable from a 1996 dataset of 600 Alberta staff nurses, and mapped this onto the 1998 dataset. This mapping was done using a regression model with statistically significant matching predictors between datasets. Method: A hierarchical model, with nurses nested within nursing units within hospitals was used to partition and explained the variance in research utilization at three levels of individual nurses, nursing units, and hospitals. We used the model to investigate cross-level interrelationships, and quantify the amount of the variance in research utilization explained at the individual and organizational levels. We further obtained robust estimate of parameter estimate using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation (MCMC). Findings: Research utilization (RU) varies significantly at all three levels: individual nurse level [variance= 0.94 (91.85% of the total variance in RU), p&lt;0.001]; nursing unit level [0.037 (3.62%), p=0.0005]; and at the hospital level [0.047(4.53), p=0.0063]. Significant factors found to predict research utilization among nurse were: nurse education, control over practice, freedom to make decisions, emotional exhaustion, and good nursing leadership on unit. Conclusions: Variation in research utilization was mainly attributed to differences in individual characteristics of nurses, with organizational factors contributing less. Of the latter, however, having good leadership on the unit was the most significant determinant of research utilization Implications: Although organizational determinants explain less of the variance in our model, they are still statistically significant when analyzed alone, and may constitute the threshold needed before individual determinants can exert their considerable influence</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:09:05Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:09:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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