2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151651
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure Among Restaurant and Bar Workers
Abstract:
Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure Among Restaurant and Bar Workers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Hahn, Ellen J., DNS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Kay Rayens, PhD; Chizimuzo Okoli, MSN, RN
Objective: To assess the level of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among restaurant and bar workers from three communities with different policy environments. Design: Cross-sectional, nonexperimental. Sample/Setting/Years: 106 restaurant and bar workers from three communities, February-May, 2003. Study Variables: Hair nicotine, work establishment characteristics, SHS exposure at work and home. Methods: Quota sampling using smoking prevalence and type of establishment, hair samples at local health departments, self-report questionnaires. Findings: Almost all (92%) worked in a place that allowed smoking. Nonsmokers working in places that allowed smoking had higher hair nicotine levels than nonsmokers from smoke-free establishments. Smokers were more likely to be satisfied or very satisfied with their work smoking policy than nonsmokers. Those working in smoke-free establishments were more likely to be satified with their policies than those working in places that allowed smoking. Conclusions: Nonsmokers who work in places that allow smoking are at risk for smoking-attributable diseases. Nonsmoking servers exposed to SHS at work were less satisfied with their policies than those who work in smoke-free places. Servers in communities that ban smoking may be more satisfied with the rules than those in communities that allow smoking. Implications: Promoting smoke-free laws and private sector policies is important to protect worker health and reduce morbidity and mortality from SHS exposure.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSecondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure Among Restaurant and Bar Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151651-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure Among Restaurant and Bar Workers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hahn, Ellen J., DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ejhahn00@pop.uky.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Kay Rayens, PhD; Chizimuzo Okoli, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To assess the level of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among restaurant and bar workers from three communities with different policy environments. Design: Cross-sectional, nonexperimental. Sample/Setting/Years: 106 restaurant and bar workers from three communities, February-May, 2003. Study Variables: Hair nicotine, work establishment characteristics, SHS exposure at work and home. Methods: Quota sampling using smoking prevalence and type of establishment, hair samples at local health departments, self-report questionnaires. Findings: Almost all (92%) worked in a place that allowed smoking. Nonsmokers working in places that allowed smoking had higher hair nicotine levels than nonsmokers from smoke-free establishments. Smokers were more likely to be satisfied or very satisfied with their work smoking policy than nonsmokers. Those working in smoke-free establishments were more likely to be satified with their policies than those working in places that allowed smoking. Conclusions: Nonsmokers who work in places that allow smoking are at risk for smoking-attributable diseases. Nonsmoking servers exposed to SHS at work were less satisfied with their policies than those who work in smoke-free places. Servers in communities that ban smoking may be more satisfied with the rules than those in communities that allow smoking. Implications: Promoting smoke-free laws and private sector policies is important to protect worker health and reduce morbidity and mortality from SHS exposure.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:09:11Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:09:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.