The Effects on Parents' Health of a Pilot Intervention Aimed at Resolving Behavioral Sleep Problems in 6- to 12-Month-Old Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151653
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects on Parents' Health of a Pilot Intervention Aimed at Resolving Behavioral Sleep Problems in 6- to 12-Month-Old Infants
Abstract:
The Effects on Parents' Health of a Pilot Intervention Aimed at Resolving Behavioral Sleep Problems in 6- to 12-Month-Old Infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Hall, Wendy A., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of British Columbia
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Marion Clauson, RN, MSN; Elaine M. Carty, RN, MN; Patricia A. Janssen, RN, PhD; Roy A. Saunders, MD
Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an infant sleep intervention for improving parents' mental health. Design: The study was a quasi-experimental one group pilot pre-test and post-test of an intervention to resolve infant behavioral sleep problems. Sample: Two parent families (n= 40) with healthy 6 to 12 month old infants were recruited through a newborn hotline. Parents' ages ranged from 27 to 53 (yearly family income $10,000 to $110,000+). Partners' time together varied from 13 to 156 months. For 85% of the parents, this was a first child. Intervention and Outcome Variables: The intervention included a 2 hour teaching and question and answer session on sleep problems and solutions and two weeks of biweekly telephone support. Outcome variables included: parental fatigue, sleepiness, depression, sleep quality and marital harmony. Methods: Baseline data (time 1) were collected one week before the intervention. The intervention was offered in small group sessions and followed up by telephone support and advice. Six weeks (time 2) and 16 weeks (time 3) post-intervention follow-up data were collected. Findings: Paired t-tests and multivariate analysis revealed a significant decrease in parental fatigue and depression from time 1 to time 2 with no significant change from time 2 to 3. Parental sleepiness decreased from time 1 to 2 with no significant change from time 2 to 3. There was a significant increase in parental sleep quality from time 1 to 2 with no significant change from time 2 to 3. Marital quality was unchanged from time 1 to 3. Conclusions: The intervention was effective in improving parental sleep and reducing fatigue and depression, which was maintained at 16 weeks following the intervention. Implications: An infant sleep intervention that reduces parental depression suggests that infant sleep problems and poor parental sleep quality contribute to parental depression which is a significant problem.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects on Parents' Health of a Pilot Intervention Aimed at Resolving Behavioral Sleep Problems in 6- to 12-Month-Old Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151653-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects on Parents' Health of a Pilot Intervention Aimed at Resolving Behavioral Sleep Problems in 6- to 12-Month-Old Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hall, Wendy A., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of British Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hall@nursing.ubc.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marion Clauson, RN, MSN; Elaine M. Carty, RN, MN; Patricia A. Janssen, RN, PhD; Roy A. Saunders, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an infant sleep intervention for improving parents' mental health. Design: The study was a quasi-experimental one group pilot pre-test and post-test of an intervention to resolve infant behavioral sleep problems. Sample: Two parent families (n= 40) with healthy 6 to 12 month old infants were recruited through a newborn hotline. Parents' ages ranged from 27 to 53 (yearly family income $10,000 to $110,000+). Partners' time together varied from 13 to 156 months. For 85% of the parents, this was a first child. Intervention and Outcome Variables: The intervention included a 2 hour teaching and question and answer session on sleep problems and solutions and two weeks of biweekly telephone support. Outcome variables included: parental fatigue, sleepiness, depression, sleep quality and marital harmony. Methods: Baseline data (time 1) were collected one week before the intervention. The intervention was offered in small group sessions and followed up by telephone support and advice. Six weeks (time 2) and 16 weeks (time 3) post-intervention follow-up data were collected. Findings: Paired t-tests and multivariate analysis revealed a significant decrease in parental fatigue and depression from time 1 to time 2 with no significant change from time 2 to 3. Parental sleepiness decreased from time 1 to 2 with no significant change from time 2 to 3. There was a significant increase in parental sleep quality from time 1 to 2 with no significant change from time 2 to 3. Marital quality was unchanged from time 1 to 3. Conclusions: The intervention was effective in improving parental sleep and reducing fatigue and depression, which was maintained at 16 weeks following the intervention. Implications: An infant sleep intervention that reduces parental depression suggests that infant sleep problems and poor parental sleep quality contribute to parental depression which is a significant problem.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:09:14Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:09:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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