2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151659
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating Harmful Teasing Among Middle School American Youth
Abstract:
Evaluating Harmful Teasing Among Middle School American Youth
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Horowitz, June Andrews, PhD, APRN-BC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College
Title:associate professor
Co-Authors:Judith A. Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN; Katherine Gregory, RN, MSN
Objective: The CATS: Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale (R01 NR 04838), is a psychometrically defensible instrument designed to identify middle school youths at-risk for negative psychological sequelae from chronic teasing/bullying. In addition to serving as a measure of the degree of teasing experienced, the CATS has promise as an intervention outcome measure. Therefore, the hypothesis tested in this study is: “After completing a violence prevention program, students will have lower CATS scores and Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) than their peers who did not participate in the program.” Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Students, grades 6 – 8 (N=500), have been recruited using systematic sampling from the health education classes of two middle schools of comparable socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds in an urban school district in southeastern Massachusetts, U.S. Students from the intervention school are participating in the Second Step violence prevention curriculum while students in the second school are serving as controls. Variables Studied Together: teasing, psychosocial distress Methods: All students have completed a demographic form, the CATS, and the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC); for controls this was done prior to the initiation in the Second Step curriculum. At the end of the academic year (June, 2004), all participants will again complete the CATS and PSC. Groups initially will be compared for differences among key demographic variables. Only subject cases with non-missing data on the CATS or PSC will be used in the analyses. Primary data analytic techniques include: t-tests, ANOVA, and Chi-square. Findings: Pending. Conclusions: Pending. Implications: Information from this study will provide additional support for validation of the CATS including its sensitivity and specificity. Outcomes also will help inform professionals concerning the effectiveness of a standardized violence prevention program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating Harmful Teasing Among Middle School American Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151659-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluating Harmful Teasing Among Middle School American Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Horowitz, June Andrews, PhD, APRN-BC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">associate professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">june.horowitz@bc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN; Katherine Gregory, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The CATS: Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale (R01 NR 04838), is a psychometrically defensible instrument designed to identify middle school youths at-risk for negative psychological sequelae from chronic teasing/bullying. In addition to serving as a measure of the degree of teasing experienced, the CATS has promise as an intervention outcome measure. Therefore, the hypothesis tested in this study is: &ldquo;After completing a violence prevention program, students will have lower CATS scores and Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) than their peers who did not participate in the program.&rdquo; Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Students, grades 6 &ndash; 8 (N=500), have been recruited using systematic sampling from the health education classes of two middle schools of comparable socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds in an urban school district in southeastern Massachusetts, U.S. Students from the intervention school are participating in the Second Step violence prevention curriculum while students in the second school are serving as controls. Variables Studied Together: teasing, psychosocial distress Methods: All students have completed a demographic form, the CATS, and the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC); for controls this was done prior to the initiation in the Second Step curriculum. At the end of the academic year (June, 2004), all participants will again complete the CATS and PSC. Groups initially will be compared for differences among key demographic variables. Only subject cases with non-missing data on the CATS or PSC will be used in the analyses. Primary data analytic techniques include: t-tests, ANOVA, and Chi-square. Findings: Pending. Conclusions: Pending. Implications: Information from this study will provide additional support for validation of the CATS including its sensitivity and specificity. Outcomes also will help inform professionals concerning the effectiveness of a standardized violence prevention program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:09:26Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:09:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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