2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151660
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Anger, Stress, Coping, and Blood Pressure in Elementary School Teachers
Abstract:
Anger, Stress, Coping, and Blood Pressure in Elementary School Teachers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Howell, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia State University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Marti Rice, RN, PhD; Marion E. Broome, RN, PhD, FAAN; Duck-Hee Kang, RN, PhD; Loucretia Collins, EdD
Objective: Few studies have examined anger, anger expression, or coping strategies in teachers. The aim was to document levels of anger, stress, coping, and methods of anger expression, blood pressure and cortisol in teachers, both in the home and in the school environment. Design: Descriptive cross sectional Sample, Setting, Years: Eighty-six elementary teachers from eight schools in the southeastern United States were enrolled in the study in December, 2002. Variables: anger, stress, cortisol levels, coping, blood pressure, anger expression. Methods: Teachers completed the Stress Inventory for Teachers, The Hassles Scale, The Uplifts scale, the CRIS, STAXI-2, Ways of Coping, and provided saliva for cortisol, and had blood pressure measured. Findings: Six teachers had systolic blood pressures (SBP) of 140 or greater and 44 were prehypertensive (SBP 120-139). Eight had diastolic blood pressure readings (DBP) of 90 or greater, and 12 (14.4%) had prehypertensive DBP of 80-89. Higher than norms home use of anger expression-out, anger expression-in, anger expression index and lower than norms for home use of anger control-out, anger control-in were noted. In the school environment, teachers had higher use of anger-control-in, anger control-out and lower use of anger expression-out, anger expression-in, and anger expression index. Teachers identified more hassles than norms but also more uplifts. On eight scales of the Ways of Coping teachers scored higher than norms for both the home and school environment. For thirteen scales of the CRIS, teachers perceived lower available resources than norms. Conclusions: A majority of teachers were either prehypertensive or hypertensive, Teachers identified more hassles and uplifts, had differential use of methods of anger expression between home and school, used more coping strategies, and perceived fewer resources for coping. Implications: Need for blood pressure screenings and consideration of stress and anger in teachers both at home and in school environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnger, Stress, Coping, and Blood Pressure in Elementary School Teachersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151660-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Anger, Stress, Coping, and Blood Pressure in Elementary School Teachers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Howell, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chowell@gsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marti Rice, RN, PhD; Marion E. Broome, RN, PhD, FAAN; Duck-Hee Kang, RN, PhD; Loucretia Collins, EdD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Few studies have examined anger, anger expression, or coping strategies in teachers. The aim was to document levels of anger, stress, coping, and methods of anger expression, blood pressure and cortisol in teachers, both in the home and in the school environment. Design: Descriptive cross sectional Sample, Setting, Years: Eighty-six elementary teachers from eight schools in the southeastern United States were enrolled in the study in December, 2002. Variables: anger, stress, cortisol levels, coping, blood pressure, anger expression. Methods: Teachers completed the Stress Inventory for Teachers, The Hassles Scale, The Uplifts scale, the CRIS, STAXI-2, Ways of Coping, and provided saliva for cortisol, and had blood pressure measured. Findings: Six teachers had systolic blood pressures (SBP) of 140 or greater and 44 were prehypertensive (SBP 120-139). Eight had diastolic blood pressure readings (DBP) of 90 or greater, and 12 (14.4%) had prehypertensive DBP of 80-89. Higher than norms home use of anger expression-out, anger expression-in, anger expression index and lower than norms for home use of anger control-out, anger control-in were noted. In the school environment, teachers had higher use of anger-control-in, anger control-out and lower use of anger expression-out, anger expression-in, and anger expression index. Teachers identified more hassles than norms but also more uplifts. On eight scales of the Ways of Coping teachers scored higher than norms for both the home and school environment. For thirteen scales of the CRIS, teachers perceived lower available resources than norms. Conclusions: A majority of teachers were either prehypertensive or hypertensive, Teachers identified more hassles and uplifts, had differential use of methods of anger expression between home and school, used more coping strategies, and perceived fewer resources for coping. Implications: Need for blood pressure screenings and consideration of stress and anger in teachers both at home and in school environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:09:28Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:09:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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