Pilot Test of the Independent Lifestyle Assistant (ILSA) to Increase Elder Independence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151666
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pilot Test of the Independent Lifestyle Assistant (ILSA) to Increase Elder Independence
Abstract:
Pilot Test of the Independent Lifestyle Assistant (ILSA) to Increase Elder Independence
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Krichbaum, Kathleen E., MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Purpose: Test the effectiveness of an intelligent home automation system based on integration of mobility and medication taking sensors to support elder users to live independently at home. Sensor information was transmitted via the internet to a central computer that interpreted the information and reported mobility patterns and medication access to both elders and family caregivers. Alerts were issued over the web and by phone to family caregivers if medications were missed for a day and/or if mobility patterns varied by 50% from normal levels. Design: Single group longitudinal pilot test occurred over 6 months in 11 elder homes in Minnesota and Florida. Elders had to be over 65, living alone, independent in ADLs, and have at least one family member with a computer who was consistently in contact with the elder. Method: Baseline assessments included measures of health (SF-36), cognition (MMSE), comfort with technology, current medications, and a profile of normal activity. Elders and family caregivers completed weekly interviews regarding use of and responses to ILSA. The SF-36 and MMSE were repeated at 3 and 6 months. Two focus groups were held. Results: Elders had high levels of health; physical health did not change and mental health declined slightly though not significantly. Cognition improved; also not significantly. Reminders for medications decreased significantly over time as did mobility alerts. Elders found that being able to view system output from the monitors was empowering and satisfying. Implications: Elders' responses to ILSA indicated that supplying reminders and sharing information with them about their activities facilitated independence at home. Prototypes are being developed for further testing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePilot Test of the Independent Lifestyle Assistant (ILSA) to Increase Elder Independenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151666-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pilot Test of the Independent Lifestyle Assistant (ILSA) to Increase Elder Independence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Krichbaum, Kathleen E., MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">krich001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Test the effectiveness of an intelligent home automation system based on integration of mobility and medication taking sensors to support elder users to live independently at home. Sensor information was transmitted via the internet to a central computer that interpreted the information and reported mobility patterns and medication access to both elders and family caregivers. Alerts were issued over the web and by phone to family caregivers if medications were missed for a day and/or if mobility patterns varied by 50% from normal levels. Design: Single group longitudinal pilot test occurred over 6 months in 11 elder homes in Minnesota and Florida. Elders had to be over 65, living alone, independent in ADLs, and have at least one family member with a computer who was consistently in contact with the elder. Method: Baseline assessments included measures of health (SF-36), cognition (MMSE), comfort with technology, current medications, and a profile of normal activity. Elders and family caregivers completed weekly interviews regarding use of and responses to ILSA. The SF-36 and MMSE were repeated at 3 and 6 months. Two focus groups were held. Results: Elders had high levels of health; physical health did not change and mental health declined slightly though not significantly. Cognition improved; also not significantly. Reminders for medications decreased significantly over time as did mobility alerts. Elders found that being able to view system output from the monitors was empowering and satisfying. Implications: Elders' responses to ILSA indicated that supplying reminders and sharing information with them about their activities facilitated independence at home. Prototypes are being developed for further testing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:09:41Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:09:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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