Rural Nurses' Responses to Providing Nursing Care to Persons With HIV/AIDS and Their Family Caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151681
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural Nurses' Responses to Providing Nursing Care to Persons With HIV/AIDS and Their Family Caregivers
Abstract:
Rural Nurses' Responses to Providing Nursing Care to Persons With HIV/AIDS and Their Family Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Mullins, Iris, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Radford University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate rural nurses' experiences of providing nursing care to persons with HIV/AIDS (PWAs) and their family caregivers. Design: A descriptive correlational design was used. Conceptual Framework: Benner's Model of the five levels of proficiency was the conceptual model for the study. Population and Sample: The population for this study was registered nurses. The sample was 204 registered nurses with rural zip code mailing addresses. The study was conducted during 2003. Variables: Relationships among demographic variables, experiences of caregiving to PWAs and their family caregivers, satisfaction with caregiving, stress of caregiving, courtesy stigma, fear of AIDS, safe nursing practices, and proficiency in AIDS care were assessed to determine which variables best predict proficiency in providing caregiving. Instruments included a demographic data questionnaire and standardized instruments. Methods: A modified Dillman method was used for the survey. Findings: Nurses who reported more proficiency in caring for PWAs and their family caregivers had less fear of AIDS and more satisfaction with caregiving. There were no differences between the responses of nurses who worked in urban settings and nurses who worked in rural settings for the variables safe nursing practices, courtesy stigma, fear of AIDS, and proficiency in caring for PWAs and their family caregivers. Nursies working in urban settings reported greater contact with PWAs than nurses working in rural settings. Conclusions: AIDS contact and how many PWAs the nurse has cared for in the past 5 years were predictors of proficiency in AIDS Caregiving. Implications: In assisting nurses to develop expertise in caring for persons with HIV/AIDS it is important that nurses care for multiple clients with HIV/AIDS. Basic nursing educational programs and continued education programs should consider including practicum experiences to assist the nurse to have multiple incidents of caregiving for PWAs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural Nurses' Responses to Providing Nursing Care to Persons With HIV/AIDS and Their Family Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151681-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rural Nurses' Responses to Providing Nursing Care to Persons With HIV/AIDS and Their Family Caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mullins, Iris, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Radford University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">imullins@radford.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate rural nurses' experiences of providing nursing care to persons with HIV/AIDS (PWAs) and their family caregivers. Design: A descriptive correlational design was used. Conceptual Framework: Benner's Model of the five levels of proficiency was the conceptual model for the study. Population and Sample: The population for this study was registered nurses. The sample was 204 registered nurses with rural zip code mailing addresses. The study was conducted during 2003. Variables: Relationships among demographic variables, experiences of caregiving to PWAs and their family caregivers, satisfaction with caregiving, stress of caregiving, courtesy stigma, fear of AIDS, safe nursing practices, and proficiency in AIDS care were assessed to determine which variables best predict proficiency in providing caregiving. Instruments included a demographic data questionnaire and standardized instruments. Methods: A modified Dillman method was used for the survey. Findings: Nurses who reported more proficiency in caring for PWAs and their family caregivers had less fear of AIDS and more satisfaction with caregiving. There were no differences between the responses of nurses who worked in urban settings and nurses who worked in rural settings for the variables safe nursing practices, courtesy stigma, fear of AIDS, and proficiency in caring for PWAs and their family caregivers. Nursies working in urban settings reported greater contact with PWAs than nurses working in rural settings. Conclusions: AIDS contact and how many PWAs the nurse has cared for in the past 5 years were predictors of proficiency in AIDS Caregiving. Implications: In assisting nurses to develop expertise in caring for persons with HIV/AIDS it is important that nurses care for multiple clients with HIV/AIDS. Basic nursing educational programs and continued education programs should consider including practicum experiences to assist the nurse to have multiple incidents of caregiving for PWAs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:10:10Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:10:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.