2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151690
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Professional Experiences of Nurse Cancer Survivors
Abstract:
The Professional Experiences of Nurse Cancer Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Picard, Carol, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts Lowell
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Joan M. Agretelis, PhD, RN; Rosanna F. DeMarco, RN, PhD, ACRN
Purpose: Understand the professional experiences of nurses who are also cancer survivors. Specific Aims: To identify dimensions of nurses’ professional experiences of cancer survivorship. Methods: Descriptive phenomenologic study design with two in-depth interviews. Thematic and pattern analysis using methodology of Newman and VanManen. Participants were 25 registered nurses diagnosed with cancer. Average age was 50 years with 20 participants being less than five years from initial diagnosis. Results: Professional experiences of cancer survivorship fell under 5 themes: 1) role ambiguity 2) a deepening level of compassion 3) self-disclosure as a therapeutic intervention 4) becoming an advocate for change and 5) volunteerism. Conclusions: Cancer survivorship was a factor in re-shaping participants’ clinical practice. Nurses experienced a deepening level of compassion for patients and selectively used self-disclosure with patients where appropriate. During and shortly after treatment the difficulty of role ambiguity, being both patient and nurse, could cause difficulties. They took action to change their clinical environment through their influence on colleagues, the healthcare system and by work through other organizations to improve the patient care. They also contributed through community efforts to cancer treatment and prevention. Implications: Nurse cancer survivors can benefit from the support of colleagues and providers. An invitation for dialogue as they return to work may help with role ambiguity. Based on this study, nurses value the opportunity to enhance care environments with their “two-world” knowledge. Nurses in all settings can learn from their cancer survivor colleagues who have been the recipients of care to reflect on their own clinical practice in the areas of advocacy and sensitivity to patient concerns.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Professional Experiences of Nurse Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151690-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Professional Experiences of Nurse Cancer Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Picard, Carol, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts Lowell</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carolpicard@verizon.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joan M. Agretelis, PhD, RN; Rosanna F. DeMarco, RN, PhD, ACRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Understand the professional experiences of nurses who are also cancer survivors. Specific Aims: To identify dimensions of nurses&rsquo; professional experiences of cancer survivorship. Methods: Descriptive phenomenologic study design with two in-depth interviews. Thematic and pattern analysis using methodology of Newman and VanManen. Participants were 25 registered nurses diagnosed with cancer. Average age was 50 years with 20 participants being less than five years from initial diagnosis. Results: Professional experiences of cancer survivorship fell under 5 themes: 1) role ambiguity 2) a deepening level of compassion 3) self-disclosure as a therapeutic intervention 4) becoming an advocate for change and 5) volunteerism. Conclusions: Cancer survivorship was a factor in re-shaping participants&rsquo; clinical practice. Nurses experienced a deepening level of compassion for patients and selectively used self-disclosure with patients where appropriate. During and shortly after treatment the difficulty of role ambiguity, being both patient and nurse, could cause difficulties. They took action to change their clinical environment through their influence on colleagues, the healthcare system and by work through other organizations to improve the patient care. They also contributed through community efforts to cancer treatment and prevention. Implications: Nurse cancer survivors can benefit from the support of colleagues and providers. An invitation for dialogue as they return to work may help with role ambiguity. Based on this study, nurses value the opportunity to enhance care environments with their &ldquo;two-world&rdquo; knowledge. Nurses in all settings can learn from their cancer survivor colleagues who have been the recipients of care to reflect on their own clinical practice in the areas of advocacy and sensitivity to patient concerns.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:10:28Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:10:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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