Learning From Success: Improving Undergraduate Education by Understanding the Capabilities of Successful Nurse Graduates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151698
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning From Success: Improving Undergraduate Education by Understanding the Capabilities of Successful Nurse Graduates
Abstract:
Learning From Success: Improving Undergraduate Education by Understanding the Capabilities of Successful Nurse Graduates
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Rochester, Suzanne Freda, RN, RM, MA, (Syd), MN, (res), (UTS)
P.I. Institution Name:University of Technology, Sydney
Title:Lecturer
Co-Authors:Kathleen Kerry Kilstoff, RN, BA, Dip, ED, MA, (Macq)
Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the capabilities seen to be the most important for successful nursing practice during the first 2 - 6 years following university graduation and to evaluate the degree to which university programs were developing these capabilities. As this study forms part of a series of linked studies across discipline areas a further aim was to compare results across disciplines. Design and Method: The survey instrument items used for this study and others in the linked series was generated through extensive research by the Quality Unit at the University of Technology, Sydney. Respondents to the survey were asked to indicate the level of importance of an item (49 in total) to their workplace success and how well this item was addressed within their degree. The nursing component of this research was carried out in two phases. In phase 1 two registered nurses identified as high performers by their supervisor were recruited to the study. These nurses and their supervisor where interviewed extensively and resultant data scrutinised to determine the applicability of the survey instrument. In phase two a further 17 Registered Nurses again identified as high performers were asked to complete the survey. Findings: The results from this study suggest that while capability in technical skills is necessary for successful practice as a nurse, it is not sufficient. A range of 'emotional intelligence' and cognitive capabilities were identified as the most significant factors for successful practice. While the sample size for the nursing study is small and results should be evaluated in this light, these findings are strengthened by their similarity to the results in other discipline areas. Implications: By directing attention to the total undergraduate learning experience curriculum developers can do much to provide educational opportunities that encourage development of the capabilities identified.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning From Success: Improving Undergraduate Education by Understanding the Capabilities of Successful Nurse Graduatesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151698-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning From Success: Improving Undergraduate Education by Understanding the Capabilities of Successful Nurse Graduates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rochester, Suzanne Freda, RN, RM, MA, (Syd), MN, (res), (UTS)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Technology, Sydney</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Suzanne.Rochester@uts.edu.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen Kerry Kilstoff, RN, BA, Dip, ED, MA, (Macq)</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the capabilities seen to be the most important for successful nursing practice during the first 2 - 6 years following university graduation and to evaluate the degree to which university programs were developing these capabilities. As this study forms part of a series of linked studies across discipline areas a further aim was to compare results across disciplines. Design and Method: The survey instrument items used for this study and others in the linked series was generated through extensive research by the Quality Unit at the University of Technology, Sydney. Respondents to the survey were asked to indicate the level of importance of an item (49 in total) to their workplace success and how well this item was addressed within their degree. The nursing component of this research was carried out in two phases. In phase 1 two registered nurses identified as high performers by their supervisor were recruited to the study. These nurses and their supervisor where interviewed extensively and resultant data scrutinised to determine the applicability of the survey instrument. In phase two a further 17 Registered Nurses again identified as high performers were asked to complete the survey. Findings: The results from this study suggest that while capability in technical skills is necessary for successful practice as a nurse, it is not sufficient. A range of 'emotional intelligence' and cognitive capabilities were identified as the most significant factors for successful practice. While the sample size for the nursing study is small and results should be evaluated in this light, these findings are strengthened by their similarity to the results in other discipline areas. Implications: By directing attention to the total undergraduate learning experience curriculum developers can do much to provide educational opportunities that encourage development of the capabilities identified.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:10:44Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:10:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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