2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151700
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spoken Words: Oral History Methods and Cultural Meaning
Abstract:
Spoken Words: Oral History Methods and Cultural Meaning
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Sampson, Deborah A., ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
Title:NIH/NINR Predoctoral Fellow
Objective: This presentation identifies how the culturally mediated process of oral history can contribute to the larger body of nursing knowledge. This presentation considers how oral history adds to historical inquiry and how oral history differs from other qualitative interviewing methods. An overview of oral history methods will be presented and ethical considerations of historical research will be examined. Implications: Oral history interviews can add to historical inquiry by collecting memories of interactions, relationships, dynamics, and contexts that may be missing or incomplete in print data. These interviews, then, document individual memories of events pertinent to topics in nursing history and can collect data that would otherwise be lost. A basic assumption of oral history methodology is that research is not done 'to' a human subject, but is a collaborative process 'between' humans, the historian (interviewer) and the narrator (subject of the interview). Since oral history is, by definition, a mechanism for capturing personal stories within the research relationship of the researcher and subject, language is at the center of this research method. Therefore, the culture of both the interviewer and interviewee can affect how the story is told and how the story is understood and interpreted since, even among people of the same linguistic tradition, the meaning of words and stories varies culturally. This paper will examine the steps of the interview process, challenges of accessibility to oral history subjects, dynamics of interviewer/interviewee relationship, how oral history data are analyzed, cultural perspectives of interviewing, and methods of cataloging oral history narratives for future access by scholars. Time, expense and equipment factors will be presented and ethical and legal considerations will be discussed, focusing on international standards for human subjects research and variations in cultural contexts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpoken Words: Oral History Methods and Cultural Meaningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151700-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spoken Words: Oral History Methods and Cultural Meaning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sampson, Deborah A., ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">NIH/NINR Predoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dsampson@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This presentation identifies how the culturally mediated process of oral history can contribute to the larger body of nursing knowledge. This presentation considers how oral history adds to historical inquiry and how oral history differs from other qualitative interviewing methods. An overview of oral history methods will be presented and ethical considerations of historical research will be examined. Implications: Oral history interviews can add to historical inquiry by collecting memories of interactions, relationships, dynamics, and contexts that may be missing or incomplete in print data. These interviews, then, document individual memories of events pertinent to topics in nursing history and can collect data that would otherwise be lost. A basic assumption of oral history methodology is that research is not done 'to' a human subject, but is a collaborative process 'between' humans, the historian (interviewer) and the narrator (subject of the interview). Since oral history is, by definition, a mechanism for capturing personal stories within the research relationship of the researcher and subject, language is at the center of this research method. Therefore, the culture of both the interviewer and interviewee can affect how the story is told and how the story is understood and interpreted since, even among people of the same linguistic tradition, the meaning of words and stories varies culturally. This paper will examine the steps of the interview process, challenges of accessibility to oral history subjects, dynamics of interviewer/interviewee relationship, how oral history data are analyzed, cultural perspectives of interviewing, and methods of cataloging oral history narratives for future access by scholars. Time, expense and equipment factors will be presented and ethical and legal considerations will be discussed, focusing on international standards for human subjects research and variations in cultural contexts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:10:48Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:10:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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