2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151721
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Students to Evaluate and Implement Nursing Care Based on Evidence
Abstract:
Teaching Students to Evaluate and Implement Nursing Care Based on Evidence
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Coverston, Catherine R., RNC, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Assistant Professor
Background: Nursing education is highly dependent on the clinical settings available for practice. Although, in a perfect world, students would only practice in environments that observe evidence based nursing (EBN), this is not always the case. Even in environments where protocols are based on evidence, physician practice, nurses’ attitudes, and local traditions may subvert adherence. This is not only a problem for patients, but for nursing as well. The opinions and behaviors of the nurses with whom students practice may overshadow and even threaten acceptance of the EBN taught in the students’ classroom. This condition is often complicated by students’ reverence for the “real” nurses with whom they work in clinical. Students may see faculty as “Ivory tower”, outdated, or just not based in reality. Students also may be intimidated by the confidence and experience of the nurses with whom they work. After all, they may ask, “Who am I to question this nurse who has been practicing for twenty years?” If nursing students are to become agents capable of changing practice as evidence arises, students need to become confident in their ability to assess both the evidence and actual practice. Intervention: Nursing students enrolled in a Childbirth elective were required to critique at least five nursing or medical intervention each clinical day based on evidence. Collections of evidence based research such as the Cochrane Data Base as well as other research reports were used. The critique included the circumstances in which the intervention was used, the opinion of the nurse with whom the student was working and political, environmental and personal reasons for the situation. Students also wrote “alternative approaches” to situations in which EBN was not observed. Results: Students developed confidence in their ability to read and apply research and make a case for EBN protocols and practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching Students to Evaluate and Implement Nursing Care Based on Evidenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151721-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teaching Students to Evaluate and Implement Nursing Care Based on Evidence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coverston, Catherine R., RNC, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cc24@email.byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Nursing education is highly dependent on the clinical settings available for practice. Although, in a perfect world, students would only practice in environments that observe evidence based nursing (EBN), this is not always the case. Even in environments where protocols are based on evidence, physician practice, nurses&rsquo; attitudes, and local traditions may subvert adherence. This is not only a problem for patients, but for nursing as well. The opinions and behaviors of the nurses with whom students practice may overshadow and even threaten acceptance of the EBN taught in the students&rsquo; classroom. This condition is often complicated by students&rsquo; reverence for the &ldquo;real&rdquo; nurses with whom they work in clinical. Students may see faculty as &ldquo;Ivory tower&rdquo;, outdated, or just not based in reality. Students also may be intimidated by the confidence and experience of the nurses with whom they work. After all, they may ask, &ldquo;Who am I to question this nurse who has been practicing for twenty years?&rdquo; If nursing students are to become agents capable of changing practice as evidence arises, students need to become confident in their ability to assess both the evidence and actual practice. Intervention: Nursing students enrolled in a Childbirth elective were required to critique at least five nursing or medical intervention each clinical day based on evidence. Collections of evidence based research such as the Cochrane Data Base as well as other research reports were used. The critique included the circumstances in which the intervention was used, the opinion of the nurse with whom the student was working and political, environmental and personal reasons for the situation. Students also wrote &ldquo;alternative approaches&rdquo; to situations in which EBN was not observed. Results: Students developed confidence in their ability to read and apply research and make a case for EBN protocols and practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:11:31Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:11:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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