Racial & socio-economic differences in risk factors for cardiovascular disease among southern rural women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151747
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Racial & socio-economic differences in risk factors for cardiovascular disease among southern rural women
Abstract:
Racial & socio-economic differences in risk factors for cardiovascular disease among southern rural women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Appel, Susan
Objective: Determine the effects of SES, and/ or race on level of risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease among southern rural women residing in North Carolina. Design: A descriptive comparative study utilizing a secondary data analysis was conducted from the Mother’s of the Cardiovascular Health in Children II (CHIC) study. Population: Women residing in rural North Carolina: total n=1110; African American n=300 and Caucasian n=810. Age range 22-71, mean: 37.17 +/- 5.81. The participants were a non-randomized population of convenience from three rural counties in North Carolina. Variables: Dependent variable was constructed from self-reported health and behavioral history questionnaire to form a cumulative CV Risk-Index. The CV-Index was constructed from health information related to physical activity, smoking, cholesterol level and health history. Research Questions were: Does the CV Risk-Index differ by race, educational and/ or income levels? Does the CV Risk-Index differ when controlling for BMI? Methods: Data analysis consisted of methods using ANOVA and ANCOVA. Findings: The main effects for ANOVA were present for race, income and education (p < 0.000), with no interactions. BMI was higher in African American women 29.9 =/- 7.1 than in Caucasians 25.5 +/- 5.6 (p < 0.001). When controlling for BMI in an ANCOVA, the CV Risk-Index remained significant for income and educational levels, while there was a decrease in the significance level for race (p = 0.026). Conclusions: Women with the lowest SES had the highest CV Risk-Index, regardless of race. Implications: These findings suggest the need to focus CV risk reduction interventions on all southern rural women of low SES, not only African American women. The decrease in significance level of race and not income or education after controlling for BMI supports the current literature that suggests race should be viewed as a risk-marker versus a risk factor.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRacial & socio-economic differences in risk factors for cardiovascular disease among southern rural womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151747-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Racial &amp; socio-economic differences in risk factors for cardiovascular disease among southern rural women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Appel, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">appel@email.unc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Determine the effects of SES, and/ or race on level of risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease among southern rural women residing in North Carolina. Design: A descriptive comparative study utilizing a secondary data analysis was conducted from the Mother&rsquo;s of the Cardiovascular Health in Children II (CHIC) study. Population: Women residing in rural North Carolina: total n=1110; African American n=300 and Caucasian n=810. Age range 22-71, mean: 37.17 +/- 5.81. The participants were a non-randomized population of convenience from three rural counties in North Carolina. Variables: Dependent variable was constructed from self-reported health and behavioral history questionnaire to form a cumulative CV Risk-Index. The CV-Index was constructed from health information related to physical activity, smoking, cholesterol level and health history. Research Questions were: Does the CV Risk-Index differ by race, educational and/ or income levels? Does the CV Risk-Index differ when controlling for BMI? Methods: Data analysis consisted of methods using ANOVA and ANCOVA. Findings: The main effects for ANOVA were present for race, income and education (p &lt; 0.000), with no interactions. BMI was higher in African American women 29.9 =/- 7.1 than in Caucasians 25.5 +/- 5.6 (p &lt; 0.001). When controlling for BMI in an ANCOVA, the CV Risk-Index remained significant for income and educational levels, while there was a decrease in the significance level for race (p = 0.026). Conclusions: Women with the lowest SES had the highest CV Risk-Index, regardless of race. Implications: These findings suggest the need to focus CV risk reduction interventions on all southern rural women of low SES, not only African American women. The decrease in significance level of race and not income or education after controlling for BMI supports the current literature that suggests race should be viewed as a risk-marker versus a risk factor.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:12:24Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:12:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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