Rapid, spontaneous intervention planning during beginning-of-shift activities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151749
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rapid, spontaneous intervention planning during beginning-of-shift activities
Abstract:
Rapid, spontaneous intervention planning during beginning-of-shift activities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Lange, Linda, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
The cognitive processes involved in rapid, spontaneous intervention

planning by nurses are of interest because they direct nursing

actions and have impact on patient outcomes. The purpose of this

study was to describe how nurses process clinical data and

information to build interventions and achieve desired outcomes.

The long range goal of the research is to design and build

information systems to support the intervention planning process

and improve patient outcomes. By supporting nurses' information

management activities, automated systems could relieve some part of

the cognitive workload that is now devoted to managing patient

information. Automating nurses' information management tasks would

allow more cognitive processing time to be dedicated to

intervention design, thus nurses could design more effective

interventions and achieve better patient outcomes.



The study was built on the belief that intervention planning is an

incremental, opportunistic planning process. Earlier studies in

which nurses planned care for simulated patients found that

subjects considered problems and interventions concurrently rather

than as distinct steps in a linear process. No studies of nurses'

intervention planning during real-life clinical practice were

identified.



An exploratory descriptive design was used to gather data from 14

volunteer staff nurse subjects. Subjects were videotaped in a

hospital setting while receiving shift report, then were asked to

think aloud while planning the nursing care they would give to

their assigned patients during that shift. Next, subjects were

observed for one hour following shift report to determine what

information sources and documents were used to support the

intervention planning process. The data were analyzed to describe

the plans nurses made for their patients and the information they

used in the planning process.



A primary focus of staff nurses' planning during beginning-of-shift

activities was creating a personal, shift-specific database from

which to plan care. The database so created resided in the nurse's

own memory and in an idiosyncratic shift worksheet that was

discarded at the end of the day. Nurses used a consistent data

gathering routine in order to determine the up-to-the-minute status

of patients before they began the day's patient care activities. A

second major focus of planning was setting priorities for nursing

actions among the multiple patients assigned. Nurses achieved a

fragile and dynamic balance among competing needs of patients,

physicians, and family members in order to give care.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRapid, spontaneous intervention planning during beginning-of-shift activitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151749-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rapid, spontaneous intervention planning during beginning-of-shift activities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lange, Linda, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The cognitive processes involved in rapid, spontaneous intervention<br/><br/>planning by nurses are of interest because they direct nursing<br/><br/>actions and have impact on patient outcomes. The purpose of this<br/><br/>study was to describe how nurses process clinical data and<br/><br/>information to build interventions and achieve desired outcomes.<br/><br/>The long range goal of the research is to design and build<br/><br/>information systems to support the intervention planning process<br/><br/>and improve patient outcomes. By supporting nurses' information<br/><br/>management activities, automated systems could relieve some part of<br/><br/>the cognitive workload that is now devoted to managing patient<br/><br/>information. Automating nurses' information management tasks would<br/><br/>allow more cognitive processing time to be dedicated to<br/><br/>intervention design, thus nurses could design more effective<br/><br/>interventions and achieve better patient outcomes.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The study was built on the belief that intervention planning is an<br/><br/>incremental, opportunistic planning process. Earlier studies in<br/><br/>which nurses planned care for simulated patients found that<br/><br/>subjects considered problems and interventions concurrently rather<br/><br/>than as distinct steps in a linear process. No studies of nurses'<br/><br/>intervention planning during real-life clinical practice were<br/><br/>identified.<br/><br/><br/><br/>An exploratory descriptive design was used to gather data from 14<br/><br/>volunteer staff nurse subjects. Subjects were videotaped in a<br/><br/>hospital setting while receiving shift report, then were asked to<br/><br/>think aloud while planning the nursing care they would give to<br/><br/>their assigned patients during that shift. Next, subjects were<br/><br/>observed for one hour following shift report to determine what<br/><br/>information sources and documents were used to support the<br/><br/>intervention planning process. The data were analyzed to describe<br/><br/>the plans nurses made for their patients and the information they<br/><br/>used in the planning process.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A primary focus of staff nurses' planning during beginning-of-shift<br/><br/>activities was creating a personal, shift-specific database from<br/><br/>which to plan care. The database so created resided in the nurse's<br/><br/>own memory and in an idiosyncratic shift worksheet that was<br/><br/>discarded at the end of the day. Nurses used a consistent data<br/><br/>gathering routine in order to determine the up-to-the-minute status<br/><br/>of patients before they began the day's patient care activities. A<br/><br/>second major focus of planning was setting priorities for nursing<br/><br/>actions among the multiple patients assigned. Nurses achieved a<br/><br/>fragile and dynamic balance among competing needs of patients,<br/><br/>physicians, and family members in order to give care.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:12:28Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:12:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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