2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151751
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educating for the realities of pain management
Abstract:
Educating for the realities of pain management
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Zalon, Margarete, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Scranton
Title:Associate Professor
Pain management is integral to nursing practice. Research over the

last twenty years indicates that nurses underassess pain, lack

basic knowledge about pharmacological management of pain and feel

unprepared to manage their patients' pain. The purpose of this

study was to examine what is taught about pain and pain management

in nursing programs.



Surveys using the Dillman (1978) method were sent to 200 ADN and

200 baccalaureate NLN-accredited programs. The 21-item instrument

was categorized according to Carper's (1978) four components of

nursing knowledge: scientific, aesthetic, personal and ethical.

These areas were addressed by questions related to theory, clinical

skills, communication, assessment, and ethics. Faculty members'

beliefs about their graduates' preparation for pain management were

assessed.



The response rate was 80 percent. In the majority of programs,

content related to pain and pain management is a separate topic in

fundamentals and subsequently integrated. ADN and baccalaureate

programs devoted an average of 8.4 and 9.6 hours respectively, to

pain management. ADN and baccalaureate programs devoted an average

of 2.9 hours and 4.1 hours respectively, to non-pharmacological

pain-relief methods. Although baccalaureate programs had more time

allocated to specific areas of instruction, it was not

significantly different from ADN programs. Curricular differences

between baccalaureate and associate degree programs were primarily

related to the methodology of teaching pharmacological and ethical

content related to pain. Respondents were satisfied with their

graduates' preparation for pain management, but less satisfied with

the amount of time allocated to pain content.



This study indicates that educational preparation for pain

management is limited. Often, students are only introduced to

specific pain management topics. The lack of differences between

the preparation of ADN and baccalaureate students indicates that

beginning nurses have a similar background in pain management. The

results indicate that there is a strong need for additional staff

development and continuing education programs in pain and pain

management.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducating for the realities of pain managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151751-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Educating for the realities of pain management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zalon, Margarete, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Scranton</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">zalonm1@uofs.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain management is integral to nursing practice. Research over the<br/><br/>last twenty years indicates that nurses underassess pain, lack<br/><br/>basic knowledge about pharmacological management of pain and feel<br/><br/>unprepared to manage their patients' pain. The purpose of this<br/><br/>study was to examine what is taught about pain and pain management<br/><br/>in nursing programs.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Surveys using the Dillman (1978) method were sent to 200 ADN and<br/><br/>200 baccalaureate NLN-accredited programs. The 21-item instrument<br/><br/>was categorized according to Carper's (1978) four components of<br/><br/>nursing knowledge: scientific, aesthetic, personal and ethical.<br/><br/>These areas were addressed by questions related to theory, clinical<br/><br/>skills, communication, assessment, and ethics. Faculty members'<br/><br/>beliefs about their graduates' preparation for pain management were<br/><br/>assessed.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The response rate was 80 percent. In the majority of programs,<br/><br/>content related to pain and pain management is a separate topic in<br/><br/>fundamentals and subsequently integrated. ADN and baccalaureate<br/><br/>programs devoted an average of 8.4 and 9.6 hours respectively, to<br/><br/>pain management. ADN and baccalaureate programs devoted an average<br/><br/>of 2.9 hours and 4.1 hours respectively, to non-pharmacological<br/><br/>pain-relief methods. Although baccalaureate programs had more time<br/><br/>allocated to specific areas of instruction, it was not<br/><br/>significantly different from ADN programs. Curricular differences<br/><br/>between baccalaureate and associate degree programs were primarily<br/><br/>related to the methodology of teaching pharmacological and ethical<br/><br/>content related to pain. Respondents were satisfied with their<br/><br/>graduates' preparation for pain management, but less satisfied with<br/><br/>the amount of time allocated to pain content.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This study indicates that educational preparation for pain<br/><br/>management is limited. Often, students are only introduced to<br/><br/>specific pain management topics. The lack of differences between<br/><br/>the preparation of ADN and baccalaureate students indicates that<br/><br/>beginning nurses have a similar background in pain management. The<br/><br/>results indicate that there is a strong need for additional staff<br/><br/>development and continuing education programs in pain and pain<br/><br/>management.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:12:32Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:12:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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