The impact of temperament and family life situations on externalizing and internalizing behavior in school-age children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151752
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The impact of temperament and family life situations on externalizing and internalizing behavior in school-age children
Abstract:
The impact of temperament and family life situations on externalizing and internalizing behavior in school-age children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:McClowry, Sandra, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:New York University
Title:
Problem Statement: Two competing perspectives have been offered to explain the behavior of children. One credits individual attributes, such as temperament, while the other focuses on the impact of the family system on the child. The behavior of school age children is best examined by combining both perspectives so that the interaction of individual attributes is incorporated within the family system. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of temperament and family life situations on the externalizing behavior of school-age children.



Based on the literature, a conceptual model was hypothesized to test the direct and indirect relationships of the variables which were proposed as contributors to child externalizing behavior: parental distress, maternal psychiatric symptoms, family life changes, maternal hassles, socioeconomic status, and child temperament.



Method: Mothers from a New England School District were contacted by letter and invited to participate in the study. The mothers of the children served as the informants and completed the battery of instruments which focused on child behavior, family situations, and maternal attributes. Eighty-nine school age children between the ages of eight and eleven and their families were the subjects of this study.



Casual modeling with residual analysis was used to test a conceptual model which hypothesized the direct and indirect relationships of temperament and family life situations on the externalizing behavior of school-age children.



A number of standardized instruments were used to measure the variables in the hypothesized model. Child externalizing behavior was determined by the Child Behavior Checklist. Parental distress was measured by the Parental Stress Index. Maternal psychiatric symptoms were rated on the Symptom Checklist-90. Child Temperament was measured by the Middle Childhood Temperament Questionnaire, while the mother's temperament was scored on the Adult Temperament Inventory. Negative life changes was measured by the Life Events Schedule. Hassles was determined on the Daily Hassles and Uplifts Scales. Socioeconomic Status was rated on the Hollingshead Four Factor Index.



Findings: Although the hypothesized model involved direct and indirect links among the many variables, a more parsimonious model resulted with only direct effects. For the child's externalizing behavior, 56 percent of the variance is explained by three variables. Two dimensions of the child's temperament contributed significantly: negative reactivity explained 44 percent and child persistence added 4 percent. Maternal hassles contributed an additional 7 percent. In addition, 54 percent of maternal hassles was explained by direct effects: maternal psychiatric symptoms contributed 34 percent, negative life changes added 15 percent, and the maternal temperament dimension of intensity added an additional 5 percent.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe impact of temperament and family life situations on externalizing and internalizing behavior in school-age childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151752-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The impact of temperament and family life situations on externalizing and internalizing behavior in school-age children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McClowry, Sandra, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New York University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: Two competing perspectives have been offered to explain the behavior of children. One credits individual attributes, such as temperament, while the other focuses on the impact of the family system on the child. The behavior of school age children is best examined by combining both perspectives so that the interaction of individual attributes is incorporated within the family system. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of temperament and family life situations on the externalizing behavior of school-age children.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Based on the literature, a conceptual model was hypothesized to test the direct and indirect relationships of the variables which were proposed as contributors to child externalizing behavior: parental distress, maternal psychiatric symptoms, family life changes, maternal hassles, socioeconomic status, and child temperament.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Method: Mothers from a New England School District were contacted by letter and invited to participate in the study. The mothers of the children served as the informants and completed the battery of instruments which focused on child behavior, family situations, and maternal attributes. Eighty-nine school age children between the ages of eight and eleven and their families were the subjects of this study.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Casual modeling with residual analysis was used to test a conceptual model which hypothesized the direct and indirect relationships of temperament and family life situations on the externalizing behavior of school-age children.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A number of standardized instruments were used to measure the variables in the hypothesized model. Child externalizing behavior was determined by the Child Behavior Checklist. Parental distress was measured by the Parental Stress Index. Maternal psychiatric symptoms were rated on the Symptom Checklist-90. Child Temperament was measured by the Middle Childhood Temperament Questionnaire, while the mother's temperament was scored on the Adult Temperament Inventory. Negative life changes was measured by the Life Events Schedule. Hassles was determined on the Daily Hassles and Uplifts Scales. Socioeconomic Status was rated on the Hollingshead Four Factor Index.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: Although the hypothesized model involved direct and indirect links among the many variables, a more parsimonious model resulted with only direct effects. For the child's externalizing behavior, 56 percent of the variance is explained by three variables. Two dimensions of the child's temperament contributed significantly: negative reactivity explained 44 percent and child persistence added 4 percent. Maternal hassles contributed an additional 7 percent. In addition, 54 percent of maternal hassles was explained by direct effects: maternal psychiatric symptoms contributed 34 percent, negative life changes added 15 percent, and the maternal temperament dimension of intensity added an additional 5 percent.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:12:34Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:12:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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