Patterns of psychological adaptation in death and dying: An exploratory study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151753
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of psychological adaptation in death and dying: An exploratory study
Abstract:
Patterns of psychological adaptation in death and dying: An exploratory study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Dobratz, Marjorie, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Tacoma
Title:Professor
Problem Statement: The empirical literature has reported the presence of intrapsychic processes that are directed towards achieving an adaptive state in severe illness. Yet, dimensions of psychological well-being in situations of dying are unclear. The guiding theoretical frame work was derived from the following: (1) theoretical constructs of adaptation in illness; (2) theoretical constructs of psychological processes used by ill and dying persons; and (3) the Roy (1976, 1984) model of adaptation nursing theory.



Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify, from the perceptions of and reactions to situations of dying, the patterning of behaviors that defined modes of psychological adaptation in hospice patients during dying.



Design and Methodology: The design was an integrated approach that combined a causal model quantitative component, which measured variables of age, sex, length of illness, social support, pain, physical function as well as the outcome of psychological adaptation, with a grounded theory method. The grounded theory method was used to record, code, and analyze the subjects' verbal and behavioral responses to the testing of demographics, Personal Resource Questionnaire 85 (PRQ 85-Part 2) (Brand and Weinert, 1981; Weinert, 1987); McGill-Melzack Pain Questionnaire (Melzack, 1975) the Karnofsky Performance Scale (Karnofsky, et al., 1948); Affect Balance Scale (Bradburn, 1969); and the Life Closure Scale (Dobratz, 1990). A sample of 97 adults was recruited from two metropolitan home hospice programs, with testing occurring in the home.



Findings and Results: The central construct that emerged was hierarchical process patterns of self-transactions which represented higher and lower levels of death awareness. These patterns were: Transcending; becoming; reconciling; anguishing; avoiding; relinquishing; and repressing. The core concepts contained within self-transactions were the integrating forces of the person and environment influences, and the moving template of the dialectical motion within dying. The dying persons in the higher patterns interpreted meaning, connected with others, accepted and adjusted expectations, and managed symptoms. In the lower patterns, the dying persons agonized in suffering, and avoided or repressed cognitions. The themes of spirituality, hope, personal control, acceptance, time, boredom, coldness, and asthenia emanated from the data. The majority of persons in this study made positive attempts to reconcile and to integrate their own particular situation of dying. Specific individuals were able to achieve a level of cognitive adaptation in which they derived the most meaning possible from their situation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of psychological adaptation in death and dying: An exploratory studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151753-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of psychological adaptation in death and dying: An exploratory study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dobratz, Marjorie, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Tacoma</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mdobratz@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: The empirical literature has reported the presence of intrapsychic processes that are directed towards achieving an adaptive state in severe illness. Yet, dimensions of psychological well-being in situations of dying are unclear. The guiding theoretical frame work was derived from the following: (1) theoretical constructs of adaptation in illness; (2) theoretical constructs of psychological processes used by ill and dying persons; and (3) the Roy (1976, 1984) model of adaptation nursing theory.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify, from the perceptions of and reactions to situations of dying, the patterning of behaviors that defined modes of psychological adaptation in hospice patients during dying.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Design and Methodology: The design was an integrated approach that combined a causal model quantitative component, which measured variables of age, sex, length of illness, social support, pain, physical function as well as the outcome of psychological adaptation, with a grounded theory method. The grounded theory method was used to record, code, and analyze the subjects' verbal and behavioral responses to the testing of demographics, Personal Resource Questionnaire 85 (PRQ 85-Part 2) (Brand and Weinert, 1981; Weinert, 1987); McGill-Melzack Pain Questionnaire (Melzack, 1975) the Karnofsky Performance Scale (Karnofsky, et al., 1948); Affect Balance Scale (Bradburn, 1969); and the Life Closure Scale (Dobratz, 1990). A sample of 97 adults was recruited from two metropolitan home hospice programs, with testing occurring in the home.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings and Results: The central construct that emerged was hierarchical process patterns of self-transactions which represented higher and lower levels of death awareness. These patterns were: Transcending; becoming; reconciling; anguishing; avoiding; relinquishing; and repressing. The core concepts contained within self-transactions were the integrating forces of the person and environment influences, and the moving template of the dialectical motion within dying. The dying persons in the higher patterns interpreted meaning, connected with others, accepted and adjusted expectations, and managed symptoms. In the lower patterns, the dying persons agonized in suffering, and avoided or repressed cognitions. The themes of spirituality, hope, personal control, acceptance, time, boredom, coldness, and asthenia emanated from the data. The majority of persons in this study made positive attempts to reconcile and to integrate their own particular situation of dying. Specific individuals were able to achieve a level of cognitive adaptation in which they derived the most meaning possible from their situation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:12:36Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:12:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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