Nursing Skills Unique to Japanese Culture for Managing Interpersonal Relationships Between Nurses and Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151767
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Skills Unique to Japanese Culture for Managing Interpersonal Relationships Between Nurses and Patients
Abstract:
Nursing Skills Unique to Japanese Culture for Managing Interpersonal Relationships Between Nurses and Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Tadokoro, Yoshiyuki, RN, MN
P.I. Institution Name:Chiba University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Yoshiyuki Takahashi RN, MN, Assistant Professor
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Nursing skills unique to Japanese culture for managing interpersonal relationships between nurses and patients
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify nursing skills unique to Japanese culture for managing interpersonal relationships between nurses and patients.
Method: The participants were 10 Japanese nurses who were living in Australia with the experience of working in and/or studying in both Japan and Australia. Semi-structured interviews, either with individuals or in groups, were conducted regarding the nursing skills unique to Japanese culture for managing interpersonal nurse-patient relationships. A qualitative and inductive approach was used to interpret and analyze the interview data.
Results: The findings revealed that from the perspective of the nurses with both Japanese and Australian training and work experience, there were some unique Japanese nursing skills for managing nurse-patient relationships associated with the local culture.
Five categories were shown as below:
1) Building a well-defined professional relationship with their patients
2) Understanding patients? needs without verbal communication
3) Understanding the relative social position of the patient using respectful attitude, language to elevate the position of the patient
4) Offering holistic dedicated nursing care even though it is based on the patients? vague explanation of their needs
5) Highly valuing a close relationship with their patients
Discussion: Nurses in Japan have a large range of responsibilities, but they regard building a good nurse-patient relationship as important and essential. There appears to be an elaborate non-verbal communication in the interpersonal relationships between Japanese nurses and patients which may be based on the thoughtfulness, perceptiveness and perception of both nurses and patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Skills Unique to Japanese Culture for Managing Interpersonal Relationships Between Nurses and Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151767-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Skills Unique to Japanese Culture for Managing Interpersonal Relationships Between Nurses and Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tadokoro, Yoshiyuki, RN, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chiba University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">taddy@faculty.chiba-u.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yoshiyuki Takahashi RN, MN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Nursing skills unique to Japanese culture for managing interpersonal relationships between nurses and patients <br/>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify nursing skills unique to Japanese culture for managing interpersonal relationships between nurses and patients. <br/>Method: The participants were 10 Japanese nurses who were living in Australia with the experience of working in and/or studying in both Japan and Australia. Semi-structured interviews, either with individuals or in groups, were conducted regarding the nursing skills unique to Japanese culture for managing interpersonal nurse-patient relationships. A qualitative and inductive approach was used to interpret and analyze the interview data. <br/>Results: The findings revealed that from the perspective of the nurses with both Japanese and Australian training and work experience, there were some unique Japanese nursing skills for managing nurse-patient relationships associated with the local culture. <br/>Five categories were shown as below: <br/>1) Building a well-defined professional relationship with their patients <br/>2) Understanding patients? needs without verbal communication <br/>3) Understanding the relative social position of the patient using respectful attitude, language to elevate the position of the patient <br/>4) Offering holistic dedicated nursing care even though it is based on the patients? vague explanation of their needs <br/>5) Highly valuing a close relationship with their patients <br/>Discussion: Nurses in Japan have a large range of responsibilities, but they regard building a good nurse-patient relationship as important and essential. There appears to be an elaborate non-verbal communication in the interpersonal relationships between Japanese nurses and patients which may be based on the thoughtfulness, perceptiveness and perception of both nurses and patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:13:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:13:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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