2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151778
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Middle Level Nurse Managers' Role Satisfaction
Abstract:
Predictors of Middle Level Nurse Managers' Role Satisfaction
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Patrick, Allison W., BSc, MN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Ontario
Co-Authors:Heather K. S. Laschinger, RN, PhD
Changes in the healthcare system in the last decade have had a deleterious effect on nursing and nursing leadership in healthcare organizations across Ontario.  The downsizing of nursing human resources has contributed to a decreased presence of nursing leadership within health care organizations.  Nurse Managers accounted for 7.7% of the registered nursing workforce in 2000 compared to 10.1% in 1994 ? a loss of approximately 5,500 manager positions. (CIHI, 2001).  The loss of nursing leadership positions has affected the quality of work environments for nurses.  The under-representation of nursing leaders in health care organizations has left the remaining nurse leaders with limited power to create positive work environments, mentor first line nurse managers and experience satisfaction in their leadership role. This is a cause for concern as these conditions threaten the retention and recruitment of current and future nurse leaders.  The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between structural empowerment and perceived organizational support and the effect of these factors on the role satisfaction of middle level nurse managers. Eighty-four middle level nurse managers responded to a questionnaire as part of a larger study of middle level nurse managers working in Canadian acute care hospitals. Structural empowerment accounted for 42% of the variance in perceived organizational support and 36% of the variance in role satisfaction. Both were significant predictors of middle level nurse managers? role satisfaction.  Kanter?s contention that empowering work conditions influence an employee?s feelings of support and sense of achievement was supported.  These findings suggest that perceived organizational support may play an important role in the retention and recruitment of current and future nurse leaders in health care organizations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Middle Level Nurse Managers' Role Satisfactionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151778-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Middle Level Nurse Managers' Role Satisfaction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Patrick, Allison W., BSc, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">apatrick@gbrownc.on.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Heather K. S. Laschinger, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Changes in the healthcare system in the last decade have had a deleterious effect on nursing and nursing leadership in healthcare organizations across Ontario.&nbsp; The downsizing of nursing human resources has contributed to a decreased presence of nursing leadership within health care organizations.&nbsp; Nurse Managers accounted for 7.7% of the registered nursing workforce in 2000 compared to 10.1% in 1994 ? a loss of approximately 5,500 manager positions. (CIHI, 2001).&nbsp; The loss of nursing leadership positions has affected the quality of work environments for nurses.&nbsp; The under-representation of nursing leaders in health care organizations has left the remaining nurse leaders with limited power to create positive work environments, mentor first line nurse managers and experience satisfaction in their leadership role. This is a cause for concern as these conditions threaten the retention and recruitment of current and future nurse leaders.&nbsp; The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between structural empowerment and perceived organizational support and the effect of these factors on the role satisfaction of middle level nurse managers. Eighty-four middle level nurse managers responded to a questionnaire as part of a larger study of middle level nurse managers working in Canadian acute care hospitals. Structural empowerment accounted for 42% of the variance in perceived organizational support and 36% of the variance in role satisfaction. Both were significant predictors of middle level nurse managers? role satisfaction. &nbsp;Kanter?s contention that empowering work conditions influence an employee?s feelings of support and sense of achievement was supported. &nbsp;These findings suggest that perceived organizational support may play an important role in the retention and recruitment of current and future nurse leaders in health care organizations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:13:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:13:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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