2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151782
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Falls: A psychiatric in-patient perspective
Abstract:
Falls: A psychiatric in-patient perspective
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:May 19 - 22, 1992
Author:Holbert, Steven, MA/AM
P.I. Institution Name:St. Thomas Psychiatric Hospital
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
The literature on falls has focussed on incidents in geriatric/chronic care and medical/surgical settings. One study (Poster, et al., 1991) addressed the nature of falls in a psychiatric in-patient setting. Our research, a retrospective chart review,investigates the factors contributing to patient falls in a regional psychiatric facility. Over a sixteen month period, 140 falls were documented, involving 72 patients (46 percent female, 54 percent male) ranging in age from 19 to 90 years (mean age 65 years). The majority of incidents occurred in geriatric and chronic care areas; 63 percent were experienced by the patients aged 65 or over.



Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that variables providing the most predictive power for repeated falls were age, dementia, incontinence, and anticonvulsant medication. Practice implications of this study focus on risk management and nursing care interventions.



This is the first phase of ongoing research to determine probable predictors and prevention strategies for falls in the severely mentally disabled population of regional psychiatric facilities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
19-May-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFalls: A psychiatric in-patient perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151782-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Falls: A psychiatric in-patient perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">May 19 - 22, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holbert, Steven, MA/AM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Thomas Psychiatric Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The literature on falls has focussed on incidents in geriatric/chronic care and medical/surgical settings. One study (Poster, et al., 1991) addressed the nature of falls in a psychiatric in-patient setting. Our research, a retrospective chart review,investigates the factors contributing to patient falls in a regional psychiatric facility. Over a sixteen month period, 140 falls were documented, involving 72 patients (46 percent female, 54 percent male) ranging in age from 19 to 90 years (mean age 65 years). The majority of incidents occurred in geriatric and chronic care areas; 63 percent were experienced by the patients aged 65 or over.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that variables providing the most predictive power for repeated falls were age, dementia, incontinence, and anticonvulsant medication. Practice implications of this study focus on risk management and nursing care interventions.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This is the first phase of ongoing research to determine probable predictors and prevention strategies for falls in the severely mentally disabled population of regional psychiatric facilities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:13:32Z-
dc.date.issued1992-05-19en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:13:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.