Plasma Catecholamine Levels as a Measure of Anxiety and Pain In Pregnant and Laboring Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151787
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Plasma Catecholamine Levels as a Measure of Anxiety and Pain In Pregnant and Laboring Women
Abstract:
Plasma Catecholamine Levels as a Measure of Anxiety and Pain In Pregnant and Laboring Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Benfield, Rebecca
P.I. Institution Name:East Carolina University
Objective: Maternal anxiety and pain are associated with elevated plasma catecholamine levels, which negatively affect uterine blood flow, contractility, and labor progress and are associated with deteriorating fetal heart rate patterns. The study will examine plasma catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine), oxytocin and systolic blood pressure as physiological indicators of anxiety and pain in pregnant and laboring women in order to: 1) Describe patterns in maternal levels of plasma catecholamines, oxytocin, systolic blood pressure, anxiety and pain; 2) Compare maternal levels of plasma catecholamines, oxytocin and systolic blood pressure; 3) Correlate physiological measures of anxiety and pain (catecholamines, oxytocin and systolic blood pressure) with psychological measures. Design: Using a descriptive, correlational, time series design, healthy pregnant women will participate at two consecutive times including, late pregnancy and early active labor. Data will be collected every 15 minutes for 1 hour at both times. Sample, Setting: The sample will consist of 10 primigravidas at low risk for complications, in late pregnancy (36-38 weeks gestation) and in spontaneous early active labor (3-4 cm dilatation). Subjects will be recruited from four prenatal clinics and will labor in private medical center rooms. Variables: Instruments will include Visual Analogue Scales, HPLC, RIA, Dinamap pressure cuff. Methods: The subject will recline at a 45° angle to control for postural changes affecting norepinephrine levels. Blood will be drawn through an indwelling venous catheter (IV), and kept open with a saline solution. Warmth will be continuously applied to the site. At each collection point, 1.5 ml of blood and saline will be aspirated and discarded to remove any existing saline from the tubing. Over a one-hour period of time, at 15-minute intervals, 13 ml of blood will be collected into tubes containing EDTA, placed on ice, and spun in a refrigerated centrifuge and stored at –80 °C awaiting analysis. Measures of blood pressure will ensue, followed by subject markings of visual analogue scales for anxiety and pain. Findings: A power of 70% to detect differences in catecholamines expression, meets project aims. Data will be analyzed using simple linear regression, paired t-tests and Spearman correlations. Expected findings should reveal increases in catecholamine levels with elevated levels of pain and anxiety. Measures taken in early labor should increase above late pregnancy values. Conclusions: Study in Progress. Implications: This is the first of two pilot studies in preparation for a larger proposal to investigate the effects of hydrotherapy/bathing as an intervention for maternal anxiety, pain, uterine contractility and uteroplacental perfusion during labor.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePlasma Catecholamine Levels as a Measure of Anxiety and Pain In Pregnant and Laboring Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151787-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Plasma Catecholamine Levels as a Measure of Anxiety and Pain In Pregnant and Laboring Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Benfield, Rebecca</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">East Carolina University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">benfieldr@mail.ecu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Maternal anxiety and pain are associated with elevated plasma catecholamine levels, which negatively affect uterine blood flow, contractility, and labor progress and are associated with deteriorating fetal heart rate patterns. The study will examine plasma catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine), oxytocin and systolic blood pressure as physiological indicators of anxiety and pain in pregnant and laboring women in order to: 1) Describe patterns in maternal levels of plasma catecholamines, oxytocin, systolic blood pressure, anxiety and pain; 2) Compare maternal levels of plasma catecholamines, oxytocin and systolic blood pressure; 3) Correlate physiological measures of anxiety and pain (catecholamines, oxytocin and systolic blood pressure) with psychological measures. Design: Using a descriptive, correlational, time series design, healthy pregnant women will participate at two consecutive times including, late pregnancy and early active labor. Data will be collected every 15 minutes for 1 hour at both times. Sample, Setting: The sample will consist of 10 primigravidas at low risk for complications, in late pregnancy (36-38 weeks gestation) and in spontaneous early active labor (3-4 cm dilatation). Subjects will be recruited from four prenatal clinics and will labor in private medical center rooms. Variables: Instruments will include Visual Analogue Scales, HPLC, RIA, Dinamap pressure cuff. Methods: The subject will recline at a 45&deg; angle to control for postural changes affecting norepinephrine levels. Blood will be drawn through an indwelling venous catheter (IV), and kept open with a saline solution. Warmth will be continuously applied to the site. At each collection point, 1.5 ml of blood and saline will be aspirated and discarded to remove any existing saline from the tubing. Over a one-hour period of time, at 15-minute intervals, 13 ml of blood will be collected into tubes containing EDTA, placed on ice, and spun in a refrigerated centrifuge and stored at &ndash;80 &deg;C awaiting analysis. Measures of blood pressure will ensue, followed by subject markings of visual analogue scales for anxiety and pain. Findings: A power of 70% to detect differences in catecholamines expression, meets project aims. Data will be analyzed using simple linear regression, paired t-tests and Spearman correlations. Expected findings should reveal increases in catecholamine levels with elevated levels of pain and anxiety. Measures taken in early labor should increase above late pregnancy values. Conclusions: Study in Progress. Implications: This is the first of two pilot studies in preparation for a larger proposal to investigate the effects of hydrotherapy/bathing as an intervention for maternal anxiety, pain, uterine contractility and uteroplacental perfusion during labor.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:13:41Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:13:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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